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《Bran-New + Great Summary of How Human Destroyed & Controlled Earth》Gaia Vince - ADVENTURES IN THE ANTHROPOCENE: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet we Made

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This Winner of the Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books 2015 ThNew in paperback edition is a bran-new book and nicely wrapped with protective book-wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM81.66. Now here Only at RM26. We all know our planet is in crisis, and that it is largely our fault. In fact, while previous shifts from one geological epoch to another were caused by events beyond human control, the dramatic results of our emission of carbon to the atmosphere over the past century have moved many scientists to declare the dawn of a new era: the Anthropocene, or Age of Man. But all too often the full picture of change is obstructed by dense data sets and particular catastrophes. Struggling with this obscurity in her role as an editor at Nature, Gaia Vince decided to travel the world and see for herself what life is really like for people on the frontline of this new reality. What she found was a number people doing the most extraordinary things. During her journey she finds a man who is making artificial glaciers in Nepal along with an individual who is painting mountains white to attract snowfall; take the electrified reefs of the Maldives; or the man who's making islands out of rubbish in the Caribbean. Watching this consensus develop from her seat as an editor at Nature, Gaia Vince couldn’t help but wonder if the greatest cause of this dramatic planetary change—humans’ singular ability to adapt and innovate—might also hold the key to our survival. And so she left her professional life in London and set out to travel the world in search of ordinary people making extraordinary changes and, in many cases, thriving. These are ordinary people who are solving severe crises in crazy, ingenious, effective ways. While Vince does not mince words regarding the challenging position our species is in, these wonderful stories, combined with the new science that underpins Gaia's expertise and research, make for a persuasive, illuminating — and strangely hopeful — read on what the Anthropocene means for our future. Our planet is constantly changing. The energy that it receives from the sun drives the weather systems across the globe and feeds the plants that keep the oxygen cycle going. The internal processes of plate tectonics and erosion mean that the landscapes are constantly changing too. But now there is an extra factor too, our love of fossil fuels is changing the atmosphere in ways that we cannot fully understand, though the trends are there if you care enough to look. The data on all these changes is immense, so Gaia Vince, editor at Nature, decided the best way to understand the immensity of the changes happening would be to go and see it herself. Her travels takes her to the rooftop of the world to see artificial glaciers being created, mountains being painted white to increase the albedo and looks at the positive and negative effects of dams. She tracks across deserts, climbs mountains, tiptoes through sewage and walks on one man's solution to the rising sea levels; floating islands and speaks to the head of a country that is going to disappear under the waves in the next few years. Vince effectively captures the essence and idea of the anthropocene convincingly. She gives a a measured description of the current and future threats to our man-made epoch, one which could yet prove to be very short lived, and at the same time describes with a mixture of enthusiasm and caution the technologies of our epoch that could be at our disposal to help provide solutions to the threats we have created ourselves. It is an interesting book on the way that we have changed the planet so far and the long-term implications for dramatic change. As the world changes in dramatic ways, she sees human ingenuity in solving the problems that are being raised as the climate changes. By going to these places herself and seeing the problems first hand, she gets a better overall view of the state of the globe and thankfully does not hold back with her opinions as to what is happening. Part science journal, part travelogue, Adventures in the Anthropocene recounts Vince’s journey, and introduces an essential new perspective on the future of life on Earth. --------------------------------------------------- The Guardian Review: Books to give you hope The declaration of a geological era defined by mankind’s destruction might be cause for despair, but this book inspires with tales of resourcefulness and survival. On Monday the International Geological Congress was advised to declare the start of a new geological era, the Anthropocene, which means that our tribe of “bloody ignorant apes” – in Samuel Beckett’s pithy appellation – has officially taken control of the planet. The very next day, the Guardian reported on the impending extinction of the Asiatic cheetah (farmers, cars and hunting are among the causes cited for their decline to just two females now known to be living in the wild). Time to despair? If you’re an Asiatic cheetah – or any number of other endangered species – it doesn’t look good. But can the humanity that drove, starved and hunted them to extinction also be their salvation? This is one of the increasingly urgent questions that Gaia Vince addresses in her dazzling work of global reportage, which won the Royal Society Winton prize in 2015. “Will we learn to love the new nature we make, or mourn the old?” she asks in Adventures in the Anthropocene. “Will we embrace living efficiently or will we spread out over newly ice-free landscapes. Will we eat new foods, plant new crops, raise new animals? Will we make space for wildlife in this human world?” Journalism might merely be the first draft of history, but since the Anthropocene is only estimated by the IGC to have begun in 1950 and is likely to go on for many thousands of years, that first draft is badly needed. Vince set out to supply it, leaving her job as news editor of Nature magazine to trudge around many of the world’s most embattled environments – from mountains to oceans, forests to deserts – finding out how people are surviving in them. In Peru, she discovers two friends who are painting a mountain white in an attempt to bring back the glacier that made their valley habitable. In the Maldives, she encounters the young president of a sinking nation. “It is too late for us, but it’s not too late for everywhere,” he tells her, outlining a radical vision of artificial coastlines, floating islands and, if worst comes to worst as well it may, the relocation of the entire population to higher ground bought from another nation. In rural India, she meets a village chief who used satellite imaging to identify defunct water courses in the rock that are now being replenished with carefully positioned monsoon dams and wells. The beauty of this idea made my eyes water. The Anthropocene’s usual encounters with previous geological eras involve drilling, quarrying and fracking, but these villagers have effectively put a pair of spark-plugs between them, creating a model for a future sustainably powered by the interaction of past and present, constancy and change, flood and drought. Many love this book for what it says about the resourcefulness of humanity, the capacity of ordinary people to make a difference, and for those small differences to add up to something that might even turn the planet away from its apparently unstoppable hurtle towards environmental destruction. Vince doesn’t shirk the hard stuff – the whats, whys and whethers of conservation. She acknowledges that extinction is not unique to the Anthropocene, and she is clear that many of the schemes she witnesses will fail. But where they do, others will spring up. I keep returning to her book, because there is hope between these pages of colourful reportage: from the former fashion executive who is breeding Chinese tigers in South Africa to the Caribbean fisherman who has built a fruit garden on an island made of garbage. With such will and ingenuity, there may yet even be hope for the Asiatic cheetah. About the Author Gaia Vince is a journalist and broadcaster specializing in science and the environment. She has been the editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature and online editor of New Scientist. Her broadcast journalism has been featured on the BBC, and her writing has been published in the Guardian, Scientific American, and the Times, among many others. Currently, she writes a weekly online column about the natural world and our place in it for the American Scholar. A native of Australia, she resides in London.

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