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《Bran-New + Hardcover Edition + It Challenges Why Code Of Ethics Not Necessary Be The Factor in Successfully Functional Society》Peter Schwartz - IN DEFENSE OF SELFISHNESS : Why the Code of Self-Sacrifice Is Unjust and Destructive

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This controversial and idea-provoking International bestseller in hardcover edition is a bran-new book and still wrapped with new-book plastic wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM104.90 (Hardcover). Now here Only at RM25. From childhood, we're taught one central, non-controversial idea about morality: self-sacrifice is a virtue. It is universally accepted that serving the needs of others, rather than our own, is the essence of morality. To be ethical―it is believed―is to be altruistic. Questioning this belief is regarded as tantamount to questioning the self-evident. Here, Peter Schwartz questions it. In Defense of Selfishness refutes widespread misconceptions about the meaning of selfishness and of altruism. Basing his arguments on Ayn Rand's ethics of rational self-interest, Schwartz demonstrates that genuine selfishness is not exemplified by the brutal plundering of an Attila the Hun or the conniving duplicity of a Bernard Madoff. To the contrary, such people are acting against their actual, long-range interests. The truly selfish individual is committed to moral principles and lives an honest, productive, self-respecting life. He does not feed parasitically off other people. Instead, he renounces the unearned, and deals with others―in both the material and spiritual realms―by offering value for value, to mutual benefit. The selfish individual, Schwartz maintains, lives by reason, not force. He lives by production and trade, not by theft and fraud. He disavows the mindlessness of the do-whatever-you-feel-like emotionalist, and upholds rationality as his primary virtue. He takes pride in his achievements, and does not sacrifice himself to others―nor does he sacrifice others to himself. According to the code of altruism, however, you must embrace self-sacrifice. You must subordinate yourself to others. Altruism calls, not for cooperation and benevolence, but for servitude. It demands that you surrender your interests to the needs of others, that you regard serving others as the moral justification of your existence, that you be willing to suffer so that a non-you might benefit. To this, Schwartz asks simply: ● Why? ● Why should the fact that you have achieved any success make you indebted to those who haven't? ● Why does the fact that someone needs your money create a moral entitlement to it, while the fact that you've earned it, doesn't? Using vivid, real-life examples, In Defense of Selfishness illustrates the iniquity of requiring one man to serve the needs of another. This provocative book challenges readers to re-examine the standard by which they decide what is morally right or wrong. The information in this fascinating book is so at odds with what we have been taught over the course of our life...but it makes so much sense that it has my head spinning. Could it really be that our own “selfish needs” and motivations regarding my hard-earned resources are not a moral weakness but a necessary strength?!? It is written simply and clearly with numerous illustrations and examples, making it easily understandable and enjoyable for any reader. While it is a book on philosophy, I found it to be as entertaining as any piece of best-selling fiction. The underlying assumption of the book is that the widely-held philosophy (that altruism underlies all moral virtues and is necessary for the function of civil society) is considered by most to be the very foundation of society’s “code of ethics”. While it is true that societies without an agreed upon “code of ethics” quickly destroy themselves and disintegrate, Peter Schwartz argues that altruism is not foundational nor is it a necessary factor in the success of a functional society. According to Schwartz, altruism is in fact destructive and unjust and ultimately unethical. He argues that altruism is indeed an impediment and that the cause of society’s problems can be attributed not to the absence of altruism but to its overwhelming presence. If this sounds abominable to you, then you MUST read this book. Schwartz explains his premises much more effectively than I am able to relate them. The author’s thesis and arguments are based on Ayn Rand’s philosophical constructs and her “ethics of rational self-interest” (as stated in the Introduction). Fans of Rand’s work will be especially interested in reading this book. KIRKUS REVIEW : Emphasizing the “I” in Selfishness. Ayn Rand Institute distinguished fellow Schwartz (The Foreign Policy of Self-Interest: A Moral Ideal for America, 2004, etc.) asserts loudly throughout this incendiary book that altruism “is ultimately a call for servitude,” requiring that individuals “subjugate” themselves to others, “shackled to their needs. It is the demand, not that you respect other people’s property—but that you become their property.” Selfishness, on the other hand, is a virtue to be celebrated. “To be selfish,” the author writes, “is to regard your life as something precious, as something to be passionately embraced, not self-effacingly surrendered. To be selfish is to strive to achieve the best that is possible to you. To be selfish is to remain loyal to your ideas.” Selfishness protects what an individual has achieved, notably wealth. Schwartz finds ludicrous the notion that “it takes a village to make a billionaire”; self-made wealth, he insists, is no myth. “Public Interest,” though, is a myth, a ploy by politicians (never mind that they have been elected by citizens) to force people to pay for what they don’t want: national parks, arts funding, public housing, and even public schools. Value, in the author’s eyes, is determined by the market. Surely, a profitable Disneyland better fulfills the public interest than the government-funded Yellowstone National Park. Schwartz condemns progressive education for teaching “that there are no objectively right and wrong answers” and for training children “to value the crowd over the self, conformity over independence, emotional solidarity over rational judgment.” The author slyly uses the communism-tainted term “collective” rather than community, scorning collectivism that “takes the form of sacrificing 49 percent of the population to 51 percent.” The collectivist approach to government, he writes, “regards man as an ineffectual, perpetually needy entity.” For readers concerned with community, justice, and equality, this book is a real tear-jerker. About the Author PETER SCHWARTZ is retired Chairman of the Board of Directors, and currently a Distinguished Fellow, of the Ayn Rand Institute--the pre-eminent organization for the dissemination of Ayn Rand's ideas. He is a frequent speaker at educational conferences and at campus events. He writes and lectures on topics ranging from ethics and political philosophy to environmentalism and multiculturalism. Schwartz is the author of The Foreign Policy of Self-Interest (ARI Press) and Libertarianism: The Perversion of Liberty (ARI Press) . From 1987-2003 he was president and editor-in-chief of Second Renaissance Books, a publisher and distributor of titles promoting the value of reason, individualism, science, technology and capitalism. He is also the founding editor and publisher of The Intellectual Activist (1979-1991) , a publication that covered political and social issues from a pro-individual rights orientation. In addition, he is the editor and contributing author of Ayn Rand's Return of the Primitive: The Anti-Industrial Revolution (Meridian); editor of The Ayn Rand Column (ARI Press); and co-editor of Objectively Speaking: Ayn Rand Interviewed (Lexington Books). He wrote the introduction to Ayn Rand's The Art of Nonfiction (Plume), and has had chapters included in Israel: Opposing Viewpoints (Greenhaven Press) and in Racism: Current Controversies (Greenhaven Press). Schwartz's articles have been published in the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, the Hartford Courant, ForbesOnline and Huffington Post. He has often been interviewed on radio and TV, by such personalities as Geraldo Rivera and Thom Hartmann.

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