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《Bran-New + Hardcover Edition + Lessons And Insights To Be Learned From The Rise & Fall of Blackberry》Jacquie McNish & Sean Silcoff - LOSING THE SIGNAL : The Untold Story Behind the Extraordinary Rise and Spectacular Fall of Blackberry

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This international bestseller in hardcover edition is a bran-new book and nicely wrapped with protective book-wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM124.91 (Hardcover). Now here Only at RM23. What a great book! Losing the Signal is a riveting story of a company that toppled global giants before succumbing to the ruthlessly competitive forces of Silicon Valley. This is not a conventional tale of modern business failure by fraud and greed. The rise and fall of BlackBerry reveals the dangerous speed at which innovators race along the information superhighway. In 2009, BlackBerry controlled half of the smartphone market. Today that number is less than one percent. What went so wrong? With unprecedented access to key players, senior executives, directors and competitors, Losing the Signal unveils the remarkable rise of a company that started above a bagel store in Ontario. At the heart of the story is an unlikely partnership between a visionary engineer, Mike Lazaridis, and an abrasive Harvard Business school grad, Jim Balsillie. Together, they engineered a pioneering pocket email device that became the tool of choice for presidents and CEOs. The partnership enjoyed only a brief moment on top of the world, however. At the very moment BlackBerry was ranked the world's fastest growing company , internal feuds and chaotic growth crippled the company as it faced its gravest test: Apple and Google's entry in to mobile phones. Expertly told by acclaimed journalists, Jacquie McNish and Sean Silcoff, this is an entertaining, whirlwind narrative that goes behind the scenes to reveal one of the most compelling business stories of the new century. This is the story of a Canadian Company RIM whose first office was above a bagel store in Ontario. The authors tell the story of visionary engineer, Mike Lazaridis, and an abrasive Harvard Business school graduate, Jim Balsillie. Together they engineered a pioneering packet email device that became the tool of choice for business executives. At the very moment Blackberry was ranked the world’s fastest growing company, internal feuds and chaotic growth crippled the company as it faced the entry of Apple and Google into the market of mobile phones. The authors provide an overview of the phone and mobile phone industry and how it works with other companies that want to use their networks. It also provides a brief review of how data is transmitted on the phone companies’ networks. The authors are journalist, therefore the story reads like a nonjudgmental news story that presents the facts. It is well written, entertaining and reveals the behind the scene information about RIM. The book also provides a good overview of the smart phone industry. The authors put it best in the final lines of the book: ➽ "The race for innovation has no finish line." ➽ "Winners and losers can change places in an instant." "In the tech industry, they say that you learn more from a failure than from a hit. Well, if that's true, Losing the Signal will give you a post-doctoral education. Reading the inside story of the BlackBerry's helpless flameout is like watching any other train wreck: You're horrified, but you can't look away." -- David Pogue, Author of POGUE'S BASICS and founder of Yahootech.com Review From Financial Times : In the beginning there were two Steves at Apple: Jobs and Wozniak. Google had Larry Page and Sergey Brin. Yet there are few technology companies whose story is as much about a partnership as BlackBerry’s. The pioneering smartphone maker’s rise and fall is really a tale of the relationship between Mike Lazaridis, an idealistic electronic engineer, and Jim Balsillie, a chippy, mercurial manager. When Mr Lazaridis first started having business meetings with Mr Balsillie, he likened the experience to falling in love with his wife. It was Mr Lazaridis who founded BlackBerry, formerly Research In Motion, above a bagel shop in Waterloo, Ontario, in 1984, but it was not until Mr Balsillie joined eight years later that its fortunes started to change. The pair would go on to share power for two decades. There have been many books about the smartphone maker, but none of the authors has had the same level of access to Mr Lazaridis and Mr Balsillie as the duo behind Losing the Signal. Jacquie McNish and Sean Silcoff, reporters at Canada’s Globe and Mail, have spent hours talking to the partnership behind BlackBerry, and it is what saves this book from being another dull corporate biography built from press cuttings and interviews with bit-part players. Unfortunately, the juicy, tell-all anecdotes never quite turn into the sort of corporate thriller that makes for the best business narrative. Too often, there are pages of leaden, technical explanation that will interest few outside the telecoms sector. Still, you find yourself rooting for BlackBerry as the book recounts how a maker of crude teletext devices became the world’s biggest smartphone manufacturer, accounting for one in five handset sales at its zenith in 2008. Now that BlackBerrys have become an endangered device for nostalgic fanboys, it is easy to forget just how much the company got right. When Mr Lazaridis was designing the early BlackBerry, he adopted two articles of faith. First, a portable digital assistant, or PDA, was useless unless it could connect its user to others. Second, less is more. In doing so he charted a radically different course to rivals, such as Palm, and Apple, which created the awful Newton. Mr Lazaridis and his team built a device that could do just one thing, and do it really well: portable email. Bankers and other business types loved it; consumers soon caught on. Yet the invention would have been for naught were it not for the salesmanship of Mr Balsillie, who did not so much deal with customers as wage war on them. If the qualities of its co-chief executives are what made BlackBerry, they also played the defining role in its decline. When Apple released its iPhone in 2007, Mr Lazaridis clung to his two articles of faith. Over the next few years, he would be on the wrong side of every big argument: physical keyboards or touch; small screens or big ones; less or more; apps or not. By the time they realised their mistakes, it was too late. The company’s attempts at a touchscreen phone, the Storm, and a tablet device, the PlayBook, were so bad they poisoned the relationship with carriers. It would never recover. Everyone knows how the story ends. Hands up if you are reading this on a BlackBerry. About the Author Jacquie McNish is a senior writer with the Globe and Mail and before that the Wall Street Journal. She has won seven National Newspaper Awards and is the author of several bestselling books, two of which won the National Business Book Award. She lives in Toronto with her husband and two sons. Sean Silcoff is a business writer with the Globe and Mail and before that the National Post and Canadian Business magazine. He is a two-time National Newspaper Award winner. He lives near Ottawa with his wife and three children."

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