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《BRAN-NEW HARDCOVER + Explains How To Use Epiphany-Thinking & Modern Technology to Transform Winning Ideas Into Actuality》Pagan Kennedy - INVENTOLOGY : How We Dream Up Things That Change The World

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1 month ago by trustexplatform

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This International / The New York Times / Wall Street Journal Bestseller in hardcover Edition is a bran-new book and still wrapped with new book plastic seal-wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM119.07. Now here Only at RM30. Find out where great ideas come from.  No doubt Inventology will be marketed to the creative business class, but there s ample interest here even for readers who aren t actively inventing anything. ☞ A father cleans up after his toddler and imagines a cup that won't spill. ☞ A doctor realizes that an innocent-looking tube is killing his patients, then reads a newspaper article that inspires him to create a better version that serves as an early warning system for infections. ☞ An engineer watches people using walkie-talkies and has an idea. An engineer dreams of a different world and pioneers the cell phone. ☞ A doctor figures out how to deliver patients to the operating room before they die.  By studying inventions like these — the sippy cup, the cell phone, and an ingenious hospital bed — we can learn how people imagine their way around "impossible" problems to discover groundbreaking answers. Pagan Kennedy reports on how these enduring methods can be adapted to the twenty-first century, as millions of us deploy tools like crowdfunding, big data, and 3-D printing to find hidden opportunities.        Inventology uses the stories of inventors and surprising research to reveal the steps that produce innovation. As Kennedy argues, recent advances in technology and communication have placed us at the cusp of a golden age; it's now more possible than ever before to transform ideas into actuality.  Inventology draws on fresh research and the surprising stories behind many inventions old and new to reveal the steps that most reliably produce discovery. With her book Inventology, Pagan Kennedy takes the “great inventor” off his or her pedestal and makes the spirit of invention something that’s attainable for you and me in our everyday lives. She describes a process that’s not restricted to an elite few, especially gifted, super smart people, but based on living life with open eyes, being optimistic, looking at the obvious data, and allowing your mind to roam. Here are 3 lessons that might help you invent something that changes the world: ① All great inventions are born from the desire to solve a problem. ② Even if you understand a popular problem well, accept that it might take long for your solution to catch on. ③ Sometimes it’s better if you’re an industry outsider, because it allows you to bring a new perspective to the problem. Inclined to invent something? Let’s get our lab coats and start experimenting! As Kennedy shows, recent advances in technology and communication have placed us at the cusp of a golden age; it's now more possible than ever before to transform ideas into actuality. This myth-shattering book is a must-read for anyone who is eager to understand how the most amazing, important new things come into the world. Inventology is a must-read for designers, artists, makers—and anyone else who is curious about creativity. By identifying the steps of the invention process, Kennedy reveals the imaginative tools required to solve our most challenging problems. Kennedy distills the following characteristics of frustrations that lead to big ideas: ● People can spend a substantial amount of time experiencing frustration. Individuals may experience daily “nano-frustrations” that last only a few seconds. What matters is not one individual’s time, but the total time that people collectively experience a particular frustration. ● A frustration reveals a hidden problem that is difficult to detect. ● A frustration can affect thousands or millions of people in the future, a condition Kennedy refers to as “Martian jetlag.” Kennedy also identified the following problem-finding practices from successful inventors: ● Ask the community to understand a problem deeply. ● In order to truly understand other people’s frustrations, immerse yourself into their lives, put your mind into theirs, and open up your imagination. ● Continue searching until you conceive something useful for a segment of society, not necessarily for yourself. ● Adopt a mindset of continuous improvement. ● Observe better and different feedback than everyone else. ● Find tools to discern the unexpressed desires of an audience. The first part focused on inventions that were developed to address a need. The second part was about chance discoveries that opened up new possibilities. The third part was about looking into the future regarding possible future needs or technologies (like you'd find in sci-fi books). The fourth part was about connecting people with the answers to those with the problem, like people who are in a different field of study or that you just wouldn't expect to have the answer. The fifth part was about teaching creativity and inventing. The book was interesting and easy to read. The author made some good points about inventing and how it's changing with access to crowd-funding, internet databases, 3D printers, etc. Inventology takes you through the history of how many of the world’s best inventors came across their ideas, uncovering their creative process and how you can update it for today to figure out what drives great inventions and come up with your own. Highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the various ways things are discovered and invented. Key Takeaways: ✔ Inventology, by Pagan Kennedy, focuses on the first phase of creating new products: the initial imaginative steps inventors take with their minds and hands. ✔ Inventors tend to be individuals with a broad perspective who straddle two or more disciplines, are able to cross boundaries, are interested in solving others’ problems, and enjoy connecting and cross-pollinating. ✔ Inventors boost their imagination capacity by reading science fiction literature, viewing movies and even experimenting with hallucinogens. ----------------------------------------------------------------- KIRKUS REVIEW : A journalist delivers an enthusiastic overview of inventions and the researchers that study them. Kennedy, the former “Innovation” columnist for the New York Times Magazine, emphasizes that some inventions—e.g., the rolling suitcase, sippy cup, computer apps, prosthetics—fulfill a need. Others (Velcro, Teflon, X-rays, the laser) emerge as oddball phenomena with no obvious use at the time of their invention, and years may pass before people discover what they are good for. While Kennedy seems to have a low opinion of the concept of inspiration, she finds that breakthroughs often follow happy accidents. For example, researchers testing a heart medication discovered that subjects were getting erections, so the medication became Viagra. Kennedy pays close attention to science fiction and futurology, perhaps more than results justify. In the 1960s, observers who saw the future of communications, which gave us the personal computer, cellphone, and Internet, hit the jackpot because the development of computer chips was genuinely revolutionary. Improvements in energy technology and medicine have been modest, so futurists who have routinely predicted interplanetary travel and cancer cures have a dismal record. In the concluding chapters, the author explores how inventors think. One scientist told her that “the ‘aha’ moment is overrated.” Kennedy notes how the “real creativity and insight occur as people struggle with a problem in their minds” and then as they translate that into reality. “Inventology” may be a real science; researchers are beginning to study it, and teachers are teaching it. Some 21st-century creations (crowdfunding, 3D printing) are breaking down barriers (money, time) between new ideas and a useful product, so a golden age of innovation seems in the offing. A delightful account of how inventors do what they do. About the Author PAGAN KENNEDY was the New York Times Magazine’s “Who Made That?” columnist, and is the author of the New York Times Notable Book Black Livingstone, the Barnes & Noble Discover pick Spinsters, and other books. Her work has appeared in the Boston Globe, Dwell, The Nation, and elsewhere.

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