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《BRAN-NEW PAPERBACK ! + TED Talks Speaker + Must-Read Book For Anyone Strive To Succeed》ANGELA DUCKWORTH - GRIT “坚毅”: THE POWER OF PASSION AND PERSERVERANCE

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This highly recommended international and The New York Times bestselling psperback edition book is a bran-new book and nicely wrapped with protective book-wrapper. The original new book is sold at price RM 63.60 . Now here Only at RM27. Please visit the following website address link for Angela Duckworth speech in TED Talks : ① https://youtu.be/H14bBuluwB8https://youtu.be/Rkoe1e2KZJs This is must-read book for anyone striving to succeed, pioneering psychologist Angela Duckworth shows parents, educators, athletes, students, and business people--both seasoned and new--that the secret to outstanding achievement is not talent but a blend of passion and focused persistence she calls “GRIT.” ➽ Why do some people succeed and others fail? (Why do naturally gifted people frequently fail to reach their potential while others with far less talent go on to achieve amazing things ?) Drawing on her own powerful story as the daughter of a scientist who frequently noted her lack of “genius,” Duckworth, now a celebrated researcher and professor, describes her early eye-opening stints in teaching, business consulting, and neuroscience, which led to the hypothesis that what really drives success is not “genius” but a unique combination of passion and long-term perseverance. In Grit, she takes readers into the field to visit cadets struggling through their first days at West Point, teachers working in some of the toughest schools, and young finalists in the National Spelling Bee. She also mines fascinating insights from history and shows what can be gleaned from modern experiments in peak performance. Finally, she shares what she’s learned from interviewing dozens of high achievers—from JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon to New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff to Seattle Seahawks Coach Pete Carroll. Among Grit’s most valuable insights: ● Why any effort you make ultimately counts twice toward your goal ● How grit can be learned, regardless of I.Q. or circumstances ● How lifelong interest is triggered ● How much of optimal practice is suffering and how much ecstasy ● Which is better for your child—a warm embrace or high standards ● The magic of the Hard Thing Rule Winningly personal, insightful, and even life-changing, Grit is a book about what goes through your head when you fall down, and how that—not talent or luck—makes all the difference. Personally, What an inspiring and very well written book! Human beings love magic, the idea of a gift, natural talent and to be swept off their feet by a stunning piece of music or witnessing a person doing something no one has ever managed to do before. We like to believe that there is an innate natural gift that allows some people to stand out of the crowd. She suggests that she 'is yet to meet a Nobel laureate or Olympic champion who says that what they achieved came in any other way' ... than with being 'especially gritty'. Using a plethora of fascinating case studies, she concludes that 'as much as talent counts, effort counts twice'. This tells me that encouraging children and adults to be gritty, to follow their passion while embracing the fact that 'to be gritty is to fall down seven times and rise eight' is far more important than overemphasizing talent. What an inspiring and very well written book! Human beings love magic, the idea of a gift, natural talent and to be swept off their feet by a stunning piece of music or witnessing a person doing something no one has ever managed to do before. We like to believe that there is an innate natural gift that allows some people to stand out of the crowd. Yet, the author of this book suggests that she 'is yet to meet a Nobel laureate or Olympic champion who says that what they achieved came in any other way' ... than with being 'especially gritty'. This tells us that encouraging children and adults to be gritty, to follow their passion while embracing the fact that 'to be gritty is to fall down seven times and rise eight' is far more important than overemphasizing talent. Furthermore, perseverance is very much part of the path to reach a goal. She does not deny that natural talents exist but that at the end of the day, the aim is not to be the next Mozart, Dickens or Usain Bolt but rather to learn to put significant effort in what you like so that you reach your personal potential which is so much richer and wider than most of us believe. In a nutshell throughout the book Angela explains: ✔ Talent and IQ matter, but without effort they are simply the promise of what's possible and not the guarantee. ✔ Grit doesn't just mean working really hard at something, it's also about working on something that you love and staying in love with it because it feels so meaningful. ✔ Her research suggests you can grow grit by cultivating the psychological assets of interest, practice, purpose and hope and by surrounding yourself with the right people to encourage your grit. ✔ She doesn't believe grit is everything and that there are many other important things a person needs in order to grow and flourish. She also acknowledges that there is much her research is still learning. You see Angela suggests that when people drop out of things, they tend to do so because: they're bored, they don't think the effort is worth it, it's not important enough to them or they don't think they can do it, so they might as well give up. But she's found that paragons of grit have four things in common and they counter each of these excuses: Angela suggests that when people drop out of things, they tend to do so because: they're bored, they don't think the effort is worth it, it's not important enough to them or they don't think they can do it, so they might as well give up. But she's found that paragons of grit have four things in common and they counter each of these excuses: ⑴ Interest - While "follow your passion" is a popular theme of advice most of us have no idea where to start. If you're struggling to find what really interests you Angela suggests asking a few questions: What do I like to think about? Where does my mind wander? What do I really care about? What matters most to me? How do I enjoy spending my time? And, in contrast, what do I find absolutely unbearable? Begin with the answers you're surest of and build from there; don't be afraid to guess - after all there's a certain amount of trial and error inherent in the process of discovering your interest. And have patience. Know that for most of people finding your passion is a little bit of discovery, followed by a lot of development, and then a lifetime of deepening. ⑵ Practice - Part of perseverance is the constant discipline of trying to do things better. Angela recommends blending moments of deliberate practice that require you to stretch outside your comfort zone and apply all your effort to build the skills you need to master, with moments of flow that perfectly match your strengths to the opportunity and allow for effortless performance. How are you making space for moments of deliberate practice and flow when it comes to accomplishing what matters to you the most? ⑶ Purpose - Interest without purpose is nearly impossible to sustain for a lifetime. Angela has found while most people start out with a relatively self-orientated interest, as they learn self-disciplined practice, they start to appreciate how what they're doing might benefit others. If you already have a well-established interest, how might this make a positive difference for others? ⑷Hope - Can you fall down seven times, and stand up eight? Hope is what allows us to persevere when things get difficult. Angela suggests that by cultivating a growth mindset (a belief that our talent and abilities can be improved with practice), it allows us to talk to ourselves more optimistically (by challenging the reasons for setbacks or failures as neither permanent or pervasive) so we can persevere. When you're faced with setbacks, disappointments or plateaus in your progress what are the stories you tell yourself? ﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉ Review From TIME.COM : 4 Signs You Have Grit When Angela Duckworth talks about grit, most people assume she just means persistence—but there’s more to it than that, the MacArthur “Genius” Award winner and professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania told Motto. “I do mean hard work and not quitting things when they’re hard, but I also mean passion,” said Duckworth, who became interested in the subject while teaching middle school and high school students and realizing that the most talented ones often weren’t the ones who performed the best academically. Duckworth has since gone on to give the wildly popular TED Talk “The key to success? Grit” and is the author of the new book, Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance. “Getting anywhere in life, doing anything worth doing, it just takes so much effort,” she said. “If things were easier, then maybe we wouldn’t need grit. But I think most things that are worth doing take a long time and that sustained commitment. There are no shortcuts to true excellence.” The good news is that grit isn’t like eye color or shoe size—it’s not something you’re born with. “I think people can learn to be gritty, I really do,” said Duckworth. Here, four signs that you have grit—along with Duckworth’s advice for how to address any areas in which you may need a little help. 1. You have something you find enduringly fascinating If you had to name one pursuit or interest with which you think you could never get bored, could you do it? If you’re drawing a blank, Duckworth recommends reflecting on what your hobbies were as a teenager. “Many, many individuals will report starting to form their lifelong interests around adolescence,” said Duckworth. “Why that is, researchers don’t fully know. But if you can take a trip down memory lane and see what interested you, that’s at least a clue as to where your interest may begin to develop.” 2. You view frustrations as a necessary part of the process Many people get upset if they make mistakes or face setbacks—and then they give up. But this prevents them from putting in the work necessary to reach their end-goals. “When you look at people practicing, you find they make tons and tons of mistakes,” said Duckworth. “It’s by making those mistakes that you get better. Making mistakes and failing are normal—in fact, they’re necessary.” By reframing how you view mistakes, Duckworth said you can increase your grittiness. “Negative feelings are typical of learning, and you shouldn’t feel like you’re stupid when you’re frustrated doing something,” she said. “You might say to yourself, ‘I can’t do this,’ but you should say, ‘That’s great.’ That means you really have the potential to learn something there.” 3. You look for ways to make your work more meaningful Duckworth cites an experiment at Google, where the company asked some employees to rethink their job responsibilities ever-so-slightly in ways that would make them more filled with purpose. After they did that, employees saw increases in job satisfaction and performance. “Just thinking, ‘What can I do in small ways that would make this more meaningful?’ can help,” said Duckworth. 4. You believe you can change and grow When some people face a setback, they give up because they think it’s a sign that they never had “what it takes” to succeed. This is what researchers refer to as a “fixed mindset”—the belief that people essentially are who they are and don’t change. But Duckworth said that, by understanding a little bit about the science of hope, you can change your approach to build your grit. “If you have a growth-mindset theory, that means that, deep down, you fundamentally think human beings are designed to change and grow,” she said. “You might not assume you’re going to be exactly like you are two years from now because you’re an evolving human being.” That can give you the perspective you need to stick with something even when the going isn’t easy. ﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉ About the Author Angela Duckworth, PhD, is a 2013 MacArthur Fellow and professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. She has advised the White House, the World Bank, NBA and NFL teams, and Fortune 500 CEOs. She is also the Founder and Scientific Director of the Character Lab, a nonprofit whose mission is to advance the science and practice of character development. She completed her BA in neurobiology at Harvard, her MSc in neuroscience at Oxford, and her PhD in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance is her first book and an instant New York Times bestseller.

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