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    《New Book Condition + Hardcover Edition + Deeper Undetstanding On How Journalism And Media Industry Evolving In Post-Truth Era》Bill Kovach & Tom Rosenstiel - BLUR : How to Know What's True in the Age of Information Overload

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    This New York Times bestseller in hardcover edition is a new book and nicely wrapped with protective book-wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM100.40. Now here Only at RM20. Amid the hand-wringing over the death of "true journalism" in the Internet Age-the din of bloggers, the echo chamber of Twitter, the predominance of Wikipedia-veteran journalists and media critics Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel have written a pragmatic guide to navigating the twenty-first century media terrain. Yes, old authorities are being dismantled, new ones created, and the very nature of knowledge has changed. But seeking the truth remains the purpose of journalism. How do we discern what is reliable? Blur provides a road map, or more specifically, reveals the craft that has been used in newsrooms by the very best journalists for getting at the truth. In an age when the line between citizen and journalist is becoming increasingly unclear, Blur is a crucial guide for those who want to know what's true. Ways of Skeptical Knowing—Six Essential Tools for Interpreting theNews 1. What kind of content am I encountering? 2. Is the information complete? If not, what's missing? 3. Who or what are the sources and why should I believe them? 4. What evidence is presented and how was it tested or vetted? 5. What might bean alternative explanation or understanding? 6. Am I learning what I need? What if the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island occurred today, in the age of the Internet, talk radio, and hyperpartisan “news” programs? Journalists Kovach and Rosenstiel examine that frightening prospect in this book that looks at how Americans will sort out news and information as journalism struggles in the Internet era. After offering historical perspective on the way news gathering has worked and its current state of uncertainty, the authors offer sound lessons on the “tradecraft of verification” necessary for Americans to sort out truth from vested opinion. They offer examples of how reporters typically verify information in contexts from covering wars to politics. They break down the process by emphasizing the kind of information content (news versus commentary); its completeness, source, and tested evidence; and, finally, what readers are learning from what they read. Applying their criteria, the authors analyze several instances of news reporting, commentary, talk-show haggling, and blogging to discern how readers, listeners, and viewers can sort through the cloud of information. Kovach and Rosenstiel combine journalism and civics in this valuable and insightful resource to help Americans adapt to an era that demands that readers become their own editors and news aggregators. When information is in greater supply, knowledge becomes harder to create, because we have to sift through more data to arrive at it. Confusion and uncertainty are more likely." Bill Kovach and Tom Rosentiel illuminate much about the paradox of an "information age" (or perhaps a Disinformation Age) in which misconceptions and bold-faced lies are more abundant than ever, despite the labors of dedicated fact-checkers. Kovach and Rosentiel's impartial analysis of the problem and its possible solution finds matter to blame on both sides of the political shouting match, and offers solutions that don't require you to approve one party or the other. It's worth reading regardless of your political views. Although it's not new (2010), I think their analysis has only become more relevant in the wake of the 2016 election. Rather than simply blaming the usual suspects (internet culture, too much partisanship, too much pretense of objectivity, or individual "bad apples" in the media), the authors particularly note two trends in the news business (both driven by economics rather than policy) that gave free rein to hyper-partisanship, mushy false-objectivity, and outright lies, well before the internet put all of it on steroids. First, cable TV brought the 24-hour news day, promising constant "breaking news!" in place of a nightly news broadcast. It created financial incentives for journalists to immediately report every least suspicion and rumor before they get "scooped" by the competition--a stark contrast to the classic journalistic method of verifying facts, discarding unprovable rumors, and creating a polished, reasoned story that not only revealed news but made sense of it. Fact checkers who call out hoaxes after they've spread can never make up for the lack of restraint before publication or broadcast. Second, cable news stations turned to live interviews rather than recording interviews and embedding them into researched, edited broadcasts that incorporated corroborating (or conflicting) evidence from other sources. Live interviews enable partisans or outright liars to air their talking points unchallenged and unchecked. Efforts to "balance" the effect by pairing interviewees from two opposing viewpoints only leave the viewers with the false sense that all claims are equal, and truth is either subjective or unattainable. Unsure who to believe, many of us turn to the "journalism of affirmation" and select stories that affirm our preconceived views. The rise of internet news makes it easier than ever to read news all day without encountering anything genuinely new or expanding our knowledge in the slightest. The authors' solution isn't easy: in the absence of editing at the production end, every reader/viewer/consumer of news must take on some of the editor's role in order to make sense of an ever-expanding array of information, misinformation, and disinformation. We have to be aware what type of material we're seeing, who it's coming from, how it's verified (and if it's verified), why we should believe it, what patterns it might suggest in the context of other news, what alternative explanation there might be for the data points we see, whether we're getting a complete picture, and what else we might need to find out to get the full picture. About the Author In his 50-year career, Bill Kovach has been chief of the New York Times Washington Bureau, served as editor of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and curated the Nieman Fellowships at Harvard University. He is founding chairman of the Committee of Concerned Journalists and senior counselor for the Project for Excellence in Journalism. In 2004, he was named to the John Seigenthaler Chair of Excellence in First Amendment Studies at Middle Tennessee State University. A journalist for more than 30 years, Tom Rosenstiel worked as chief congressional correspondent for Newsweek and as a media critic for the Los Angeles Times and MSNBC's The News With Brian Williams. His books include Strange Bedfellows and We Interrupt This Newscast. Rosenstiel is vice chairman of the Committee of Concerned Journalists, and director of the Project for Excellence in Journalism. Together, Kovach and Rosenstiel have authored two books: The Elements of Journalism, winner of the 2002 Goldsmith Book Prize from Harvard University, and Warp Speed: America in the Age of Mixed Media. Veteran journalists Kovach and Rosenstiel begin their intelligent and well-written guidebook by assuring readers this is not unfamiliar territory. The printing press, the telegraph, radio, and television were once just as unsettling and disruptive as today's Internet, blogs, and Twitter posts. But the rules have changed. The gatekeepers of information are disappearing. Everyone must become editors assuming the responsibility for testing evidence and checking sources presented in news stories, deciding what's important to know, and whether the material is reliable and complete. Utilizing a set of systemic questions that the authors label "the way of skeptical knowing," Kovach and Rosenstiel provide a roadmap for maintaining a steady course through our messy media landscape. As the authors entertainingly define and deconstruct the journalism of verification, assertion, affirmation, and interest group news, readers gain the analytical skills necessary for understanding this new terrain. "The real information gap in the 21st century is not who has access to the Internet and who does not. It is the gap between people who have the skills to create knowledge and those who are simply in a process of affirming preconceptions without growing and learning."

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