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    《New Book Condition + The First Insider's Account Of TWITTER : A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal》Nick Bilton - HATCHING TWITTER : How A Fledging Start-Up Become A Multibillion-Dollar Business & Accidentally Changed The World

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    ★★ New York Times Bestseller ★★ ★★ Wall Street Journal Business Bestseller ★★ ★★ An Amazon Best Book of the Month, November 2013 ★★ ★★ Favourite Books of 2013, Sunday Business Post ★★ This acclaimed international bestseller in paperback is a bran-new book and wrapped with protective book-wrapoer. The original new book is sold at usual price RM88.14. Now here Only at RM16. THE ULTIMATE 21ST CENTURY BUSINESS STORY A fascinating and in-depth account of Twitter's creation and rise, from the conditions that led to its founders meeting to the shady and shabby way that the current power structure shook out. Ev told Jack he had to 'chill out' with the deluge of media he was doing. 'It's bad for the company,' Ev said. 'It's sending the wrong message.' Biz sat between them, watching like a spectator at a tennis match. 'But I invented Twitter,' Jack said. 'No, you didn't invent Twitter,' Ev replied. 'I didn't invent Twitter either. Neither did Biz. People don't invent things on the Internet. They simply expand on an idea that already exsists.' Twitter seems like a perfect start-up success story. In barely six years, a small group of young, ambitious programmers in Silicon Valley built an $11.5 billion business out of the ashes of a failed podcasting company. Today Twitter boasts more than 200 million active users and has affected business, politics, media, and other fields in innumerable ways. Since 2006, Twitter has grown from the accidental side project of a failing internet start-up, to a global icon that by 2013 had become an $11.5bn business. But the full story of Twitter's hatching has never been told before. In his revelatory new book, New York Times journalist Nick Bilton takes readers behind the scenes of Twitter as it grew at exponential speeds, and inside the heads of the four hackers who created it: ambitious millionaire Evan Williams; tattooed mastermind Jack Dorsey; joker and diplomat Biz Stone; and Noah Glass, the shy but energetic geek who invested his whole life in Twitter, only to be kicked out and expunged from the company's official history. Combining unprecedented access with exhaustive investigative reporting, and drawing on hundreds of sources, documents and internal e-mails, HATCHING TWITTER is a blistering drama of betrayed friendships and high-stakes power struggles. A business story like no other, it will shock, expose and inspire. In 2005, Odeo was a struggling podcasting start-up founded by free-range hacker Noah Glass and staffed by a motley crew of anarchists. Less than two years later, its days were numbered and half the staff had been let go. But out of Odeo's ashes, the remaining employees worked on a little side venture . . . that by 2013 had become an $11.5 billion business. That much is widely known. But the full story of Twitter's hatching has never been told before. It's a drama of betrayed friendships and high-stakes power struggles, as the founders went from everyday engineers to wealthy celebrities featured on magazine covers, The Oprah Winfrey Show, The Daily Show, and Time's list of the world's most influential people. New York Times columnist and reporter Nick Bilton takes readers behind the scenes as Twitter grew at exponential speeds. He gets inside the heads of the four hackers out of whom the company tumbled: • Evan “Ev” Williams, the ambitious farm boy from Clarks, Nebraska, who had already created Blogger and sold it to Google for millions. Quiet and protective, Ev is a shrewd businessman who made tough choices in the interest of his companies, firing cofounders and employees who were once friends. • Jack Dorsey, the tattooed “nobody” who helped mastermind the original concept of Twitter, became a billionaire tech titan, and convinced the media that he was the next Steve Jobs. • Christopher “Biz” Stone, the joker and diplomat who played nice with everyone. As drama ensued, he was the only founder who remained on good terms with his friends and to this day has no enduring resentments. • Noah Glass, the shy but energetic geek who invested his whole life in Twitter, only to be kicked out and expunged from the company's official history. As Twitter grew, the four founders fought bitterly for money, influence, publicity, and control over a company that grows larger and more powerful by the day. Ultimately they all lost their grip on it. Today, none of them is the CEO. Dick Costolo, a fifty-year-old former comedian, runs the company. Bilton’s exclusive access and exhaustive investigative reporting—drawing on hundreds of sources, documents, and internal e-mails—have enabled him to write an intimate portrait of fame, influence, and power. He also captures the zeitgeist and global influence of Twitter, which has been used to help overthrow governments in the Middle East and disrupt the very fabric of the way people communicate. In fact, the dramatic, unlikely story behind the founding of Twitter, by New York Times bestselling author and Vanity Fair special correspondent The San Francisco-based technology company Twitter has become a powerful force in less than ten years. Today it’s everything from a tool for fighting political oppression in the Middle East to a marketing must-have to the world’s living room during live TV events to President Trump’s preferred method of communication. It has hundreds of millions of active users all over the world. But few people know that it nearly fell to pieces early on. In this rousing history that reads like a novel, Hatching Twitter takes readers behind the scenes of Twitter’s early exponential growth, following the four hackers—Ev Williams, Jack Dorsey, Biz Stone, and Noah Glass, who created the cultural juggernaut practically by accident. It’s a drama of betrayed friendships and high-stakes power struggles over money, influence, and control over a company that was growing faster than they could ever imagine. Drawing on hundreds of sources, documents, and internal e-mails, Bilton offers a rarely-seen glimpse of the inner workings of technology startups, venture capital, and Silicon Valley culture. Amazon Review : Nick Bilton's Hatching Twitter delivers "A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal," though not necessarily in that order. The book's four central players--Ev, Jack, Biz, and Noah--conceived of Twitter while working on Odeo, an ultimately doomed attempt to revolutionize podcasting. As their little chick grew, the four men's personal and ideological differences led to a power struggle that eventually left them all on the sidelines as a former stand-up comedian took Twitter into the uncertain future. Writing with the pacing and veracity of detail of a true-crime book, Bilton makes use of a trove of source material--from internal Twitter e-mails to extensive interviews with and early tweets by the founders themselves--and the result is as exciting and fast-paced as it is topically relevant. If you're looking for a thoughtful rumination about Twitter as a revolutionary global communications platform, keep looking. If you're looking for a quick, well-written, thoroughly researched human drama, the story of an utterly dysfunctional foursome and the accelerated unraveling of their once brilliant partnership, this is your book. It is HighlyRecommended. -------------------------------------------- The New York Times Review : A hundred and forty characters doesn’t sound like much, but as Twitter has shown over the course of its short, intense life, they’re enough to aid a revolution, ruin a reputation or direct help after a disaster. Critics tend to focus on the irresponsibility or narcissism of the form, or to say it breeds snark or false praise, or that it enables people to feel politically involved when they’re just ranting from their couches. Sure, Twitter can facilitate the spread of misinformation. It sometimes operates (as a friend of mine once put it) as a live feed from the id. Some people use it solely to tear things down, and others to ingratiate themselves around the clock. And of course political one-liners are no substitute for being on the barricades, no matter how much @pourmecoffee makes me laugh. But ways of tweeting are so diverse that these criticisms serve as a kind of Rorschach test, revealing more about the critic and what attracts his or her attention on Twitter than they do about the form itself. Twitter’s utility and appeal lies not just in its brevity but in its randomness and ability to surprise. Within its confines, the uses to which it can be put are virtually unlimited. Even now, on the eve of its anticipated I.P.O., its true function refuses to be pinned down, and “Hatching Twitter,” a fast-paced and perceptive new book by Nick Bilton, a columnist and reporter for The New York Times, establishes that uncertainty and dissension about its true purpose has characterized Twitter from its inception. Jack Dorsey, a co-founder and the current chairman of Twitter, regarded it “as a status updater, a way to say where he was and what he was doing. A place to display yourself, your ego.” Another founder, Evan Williams, known as Ev, the co-creator of Blogger, saw it as a way to learn “where other people were and what other people were doing.” “Almost a year into the service,” Bilton writes, “there was no consistent answer to the question” of whether Twitter was even a social network. The company was financed by Williams, who made a bundle selling Blogger to Google and was intent on proving he wasn’t a one-hit wonder. It rose from the ashes of a failed podcasting enterprise, Odeo, which Williams had bankrolled as a favor to his friend Noah Glass. Bilton sketches the founders’ backgrounds and personalities in quick, skillful strokes that will serve the eventual screenwriter, director and storyboard artist well; these are characters made for the big screen. None came from money. Ev Williams was a shy Nebraska farm boy whose parents never really understood their socially awkward, computer-obsessed son. Noah Glass grew up first on a commune and then with his grandparents. When a horse kicked Noah’s brother in the knee, a relative, “a tough mountain man who took on the role of father figure,” beat the horse to death with a pipe. “That’s how you stand up for yourself,” the man told him. Jack Dorsey, a computer programmer and anarchist, was from blue-collar St. Louis and had overcome a severe speech impediment that “left an indelible dent in his communication skills.” Christopher Stone, who goes by Biz, was raised on food stamps. His mother inherited her parents’ expensive house in Wellesley, Mass., and her strategy for raising her children was to sell and downgrade to a smaller place in the area every four years so her children could “take advantage of the county’s fancy schools,” and she “could use the money from the house sale to pay the bills.” Having known hardship, none of the four founders were afraid of risk. To join the ill-fated Odeo, Stone walked away from a job at Google, leaving more than $2 million in unvested stock options on the table. Twitter began with a conversation. Dorsey and Glass sat talking in a car one night in 2006 when Odeo was on the verge of collapse. Dorsey mentioned his “status concept,” which was inspired by AOL’s Instant Messenger “away messages” and LiveJournal status updates that people were using to mention where they were and what they were doing. Glass warmed to the idea, seeing it as a “technology that would erase a feeling that an entire generation felt while staring into their computer screens”: loneliness. He wondered if the service should be based on “text messaging instead of e-mail.” The next day, they told Stone and Williams. Stone excitedly compared it to something he’d repeatedly proposed at Google: “Phone-ternet,” “an Internet, but for your phone.” Williams, too, was enthusiastic but reluctant to involve Glass, with whom he’d begun fighting. But it was Glass who would come up with Twitter’s name. The project was a collaboration: “Jack’s concept of people sharing their status updates; Ev’s and Biz’s suggestion to make sure updates flowed into a stream, similar to Blogger; Noah adding time stamps, coming up with the name, and verbalizing how to humanize status by ‘connecting’ people.” “Was it about ego, or was it about others?” Bilton asks. “It was about both. . . . A simple status updater in 140-character posts was too ephemeral and egotistical to be sustainable. A news updater in 140-character spurts was just a glorified newswire. . . . The two together were what made Twitter different.” Although Bilton’s metaphors are occasionally a little ham-handed — were Glass and the Odeo programmers really “a modern-day ­Beatles”? — he contextualizes the founders’ disagreements about the fundamental nature of Twitter with a light, easy touch and unpretentious insight. ­ Ultimately Dorsey and Williams created “the perfect equilibrium of two different ways of looking at the world: the need to talk about yourself, compared with the need to let people talk about what was happening around them. One could never have ­existed without the other. That balance, or battle, created Twitter. A tool that could be used by corporate titans and teens, by celebrities and nobodies, by government officials and revolutionaries.” As the company became successful, ­secrecy and power plays inevitably ensued. Bilton infuses genuine drama into the alliances and ousters and betrayals that saw Glass fired and Dorsey made C.E.O., and then Dorsey forced out, with Williams at the helm, and finally Williams himself unceremoniously demoted on Dorsey’s triumphant return. He shows how the money guys swooped in, cleaned house and ended up taking over. Though a sympathetic figure in the book’s early pages, Dorsey emerges in “Hatching Twitter” as the most bizarre and unlikable of the founders, the most chillingly ambitious. In Bilton’s telling, he intentionally transformed himself into a facsimile of Steve Jobs, adopting a daily uniform, wearing the same round glasses for a time, copying weekly schedules and even emulating his idol’s fondness for the Beatles. Bad uses of Twitter, as Margaret Atwood says, have been the fault of the user, not the technology. Comparing tweets with the telegram and African tribal drums, she argues in a 2010 Big Think interview that the form is “not different in nature from what we have always done, which is communicate with one another, send messages to one another and perform our lives.” Williams and Stone always conceived of Twitter as “a mouthpiece for everyday people,” and that’s what it’s been. Yet the uncertainty surrounding its purposes starts to seem more alarming as ownership, control and privacy become increasingly murky. The danger of the technology is not that it will make us more facile or less intelligent but that we can’t predict who, ultimately, will be running it — or to what ends. About the Author NICK BILTON writes about business and technology for the New York Times. His reporting generates millions of page views for the Times website each month, and covers a range of topics including the future of technology, privacy, legislation and the social impact of the Web on our culture and media. He is a regular guest on all the major TV and Radio networks in the US and the UK, including BBC News, and is a highly sought-after speaker at conferences around the world.

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