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《New Book Condition + True Story On The Battle to Save Belview Mountain Community Appalachian From Illegal Mining》Jay Erskine Leutze - STAND UP THAT MOUNTAIN : The Battle to Save One Small Community in the Wilderness Along the Appalachian Trail

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6 months ago oleh trustedplatform

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RM18

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This national bestseller & WINNER OF THE REED ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING AWARD is a paperback edition and a bran-new book with nicely wrapped with protective book-wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM77.49. Now here Only at RM18. Before reading this book , you can view the youtube video : ENVIROMENTAL ACTIVISTS PROTECT THE APPALACHIAN TRAIL : https://youtu.be/K8SPUXEOxVc In the tradition of A Civil Action—this true story of a North Carolina outdoorsman who teams up with his Appalachian neighbors to save treasured land from being destroyed will “make you want to head for the mountains” (Raleigh News & Observer). LIVING ALONE IN HIS WOODED MOUNTAIN RETREAT, Jay Leutze gets a call from a whip-smart fourteen-year-old, Ashley Cook, and her aunt, Ollie Cox, who say a local mining company is intent on tearing down Belview Mountain, the towering peak above their house. Ashley and her family, who live in a little spot known locally as Dog Town, are “mountain people,” with a way of life and speech unique to their home high in the Appalachians. They suspect the mining company is violating North Carolina’s mining law, and they want Jay, a nonpracticing attorney, to stop the destruction of the mountain. Jay, a devoted naturalist and fisherman, quickly decides to join their cause. So begins the epic quest of “the Dog Town Bunch,” a battle that involves fiery public hearings, clandestine surveillance of the mine operator’s highly questionable activities, ferocious pressure on public officials, and high-stakes legal brinksmanship in the North Carolina court system. Jay helps assemble a talented group of environmental lawyers to contend with the well-funded attorneys protecting the mining company’s plan to dynamite Belview Mountain, which happens to sit next to the famous Appalachian Trail, the 2,184- mile national park that stretches from Maine to Georgia. As the mining company continues to level the forest and erect the gigantic crushing plant on the site, Jay’s group searches frantically for a way to stop an act of environmental desecration that will destroy a fragile wild place and mar the Appalachian Trail forever. For the past year or so we have struggled with a sense of helplessness about the environmental calamities we face now and in the future. ● Extinctions. ● Pollution. ● Biological invasions. ● Over hunting. ● Desertification. ● Dying rivers. ● Mountain top removal. ● Climate destabilization. The list goes on...... It was amid this puddle of dark thinking that many began reading "Stand Up That Mountain: The Battle to Save One Small Community in the Wilderness Along the Appalachian Trail". Stand Up That Mountain is a true story, but it’s written as if it were a novel. It has a set of heroes who pit themselves David-and-Goliath fashion against a good-ole-boy villain and his minions to rescue their town from surefire environmental destruction. But Leutze doesn’t let any of his characters fall prey to trope or caricature: they are all complicated, real, flawed people who he portrays in all their strengths, frailties, quirks, and commonalities. At the broadest level, Stand Up That Mountain is a narrative of how a small band of neighbors halted the Putnam Gravel Mine from operating in their community in Avery County in far western North Carolina. The mine was adjacent to some of their properties and it offended not only their sense of quietude and their mountain views, but also their sense of community and ecological place. None of the adjacent property owners who were uninvolved with the mine were given advance notice that it would be opening. It just sprang up one day, like a giant tumor in the forest. At 151 acres, it was supposed to become the largest surface mine in the state. Lack of notice to neighboring landowners becomes the crux of the legal argument against the Putnam Mine, along with the fact that it was sited in close visual proximity to the Appalachian Trail, which is supposed to have its viewshed protected to give hikers an unbroken visual and auditory wilderness experience. In addition to running a rock crusher which would have ground large chunks of rock into gravel, a gravel mine in this area would have dismantled a mountainside piece by piece until nothing was left but a gaping hole in the ground hundreds of feet deep. And throughout its hundred years of operation, it would be seen and heard from the trail itself. In telling this part of the story, Leutze cleverly weaves technical aspects of the legal fight against the Putnam Mine into a narrative rich in real-life characters and a wild Southern Appalachian mountain setting. At times the story seems to progress blow-by-blow as his court case lurches through the state’s legal system. But this uneven, herky-jerky series of triumphs and disappointments is not a literary device — this is what actually happened. And in documenting the highs and lows, Leutze manages to make a fairly convoluted legal story into a tale worthy of being mistaken for the most indulgently enjoyable crime novel. But many also found this book to go deeper than simply presenting the story of the mine being challenged and ultimately halted. It’s a story about using the law to fight the twin establishments of government and industry, and to stand up for the little people in life, yes; but it’s also a story about perseverance in the face of long political odds, and it’s a deeply moving study of southern Appalachian lifestyles and mountain culture. From a literary perspective, one of the things that first struck me about Leutze’s book was his use of dialogue. He uses people’s accents and freely quotes their colorful turns of phrase. “At all” is “a’tall,” “yellow” is “yaller,” ” a hundred” is “hunnert,” and “I’m getting nowhere” becomes “I’m killed.” But in documenting his character’s speech patterns, Leutze is not codifying their socioeconomic or educational status. Rather, he’s revealing their way of life in a refreshingly honest and respectful way. He lets readers know that his family stems from mountain folk, and though he himself begins as an outsider in his community, he clearly has a sense of reverence and fascination for the people who live there. Readers get a sense of these colorful mountain dwellers being geographically and culturally differentiated from the comparatively more cosmopolitan and connected Piedmont where the state capital is located (and to where Leutze frequently traveled for the court case). But Leutze elevates and amplifies their marginalized voices — voices that people in power do not always want to hear. As a writer, we couldn’t help but wonder if Leutze’s extensive dialogue was drawn from notes taken while talking to his sources, audio-recordings during interviews, or remembered conversations. While he attended many of the court hearings, and worked extensively with the lawyers involved in the case, it’s also possible he used court records and transcripts to obtain direct quotes for these sections. Regardless, the final effect feels both deeply literary and highly accurate — complementary elements that I prize. Overall, this is a wonderful book. It scores high in literary appeal, details a remarkable legal fight over natural resources management, and paints an endearing portrait of mountain culture in western North Carolina. I recommend it, no matter where you live. About the Author Jay Erskine Leutze was born in Virginia in 1964. He now lives in the Southern Appalachian mountains of North Carolina. Trained as an attorney, he has become a leading voice for state and federal conservation funding for investment in public lands. He is a Trustee for Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy, one of the nation’s most established land trusts.

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