《New Book Condition + Winner Of The Nobel Prize + Hardcover 》 Joseph E. Stiglitz The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them
《New Book Condition + Winner Of The Nobel Prize + Hardcover 》 Joseph E. Stiglitz The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them
《New Book Condition + Winner Of The Nobel Prize + Hardcover 》 Joseph E. Stiglitz The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them
《New Book Condition + Winner Of The Nobel Prize + Hardcover 》 Joseph E. Stiglitz The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them
《New Book Condition + Winner Of The Nobel Prize + Hardcover 》 Joseph E. Stiglitz The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them
《New Book Condition + Winner Of The Nobel Prize + Hardcover 》 Joseph E. Stiglitz The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them

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This bestselling hardcover is a bran-new book and it is wrapped with protective book-wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM79.90. Now hardcover here Only at RM26 How has America become the most unequal advanced country in the world, and what can we do about it? In the face of rising inequality in America, Joseph E. Stiglitz charts a path toward real recovery and a more equal society. In The Great Divide, Joseph E. Stiglitz expands on the diagnosis he offered in his best-selling book The Price of Inequality and suggests ways to counter America's growing problem. With his signature blend of clarity and passion, Stiglitz argues that inequality is a choice-the cumulative result of unjust policies and misguided priorities. Gathering his writings for popular outlets including Vanity Fair and the New York Times, Stiglitz exposes in full America's inequality: ● its dimensions, ● its causes, and ● its consequences for the nation and for the world. From Reagan-era to the Great Recession and its long aftermath, Stiglitz delves into the irresponsible policies-deregulation, tax cuts, and tax breaks for the 1 percent-that are leaving many Americans farther and farther beyond and turning the American dream into an ever more unachievable myth. With formidable yet accessible economic insight, he urges us to embrace real solutions: ☞increasing taxes on corporations and the wealthy; ☞ offering more help to the children of the poor; ☞ investing in education, science, and infrastructure; ☞ helping out homeowners instead of banks; ☞ and, most importantly, doing more to restore the economy to full employment. Stiglitz also draws lessons from Scandinavia, Singapore, and Japan, and he argues against the tide of unnecessary, destructive austerity that is sweeping across Europe. Ultimately, Stiglitz believes our choice is not between growth and fairness; with the right policies, we can choose both. His complaint is not so much about capitalism as such, but how twenty-first-century capitalism has been perverted. His is a call to confront America's economic inequality as the political and moral issue that it is. If we reinvest in people and pursue the other policies that he describes, America can live up to the shared dream of a more prosperous, more equal society. A singular voice of reason in an era defined by bitter politics and economic uncertainty, Joseph E. Stiglitz has time and again diagnosed America’s greatest economic challenges, from the Great Recession and its feeble recovery to the yawning gap between the rich and the poor. The Great Divide gathers his most provocative reflections to date on the subject of inequality. As Stiglitz ably argues, a healthy economy and a fairer democracy are within our grasp if we can put aside misguided interests and ideologies and abandon failed policies. Opening with the essay that gave the Occupy Movement its slogan, “We are the 99%,” later essays in The Great Divide reveal equality of opportunity as a national myth, show that today’s outsized inequality is a matter of choice, and explain reforms that would spur higher growth, more opportunity, and greater equality. There is little that is technically new in this book. It is a collection of previously published newspaper columns, essays, speeches, and one new interview and a few essays. The main point here can be summarized by one of the essay titles: 'Inequality is not inevitable'. He makes the point that the relative extremes of inequality in the United States were not a natural law of capitalism, but a deliberate result of political forces, particularly the neoliberal policy reforms made from 1980 onward. There are subtle differences here between Stiglitz and Piketty on limiting the accumulation of capital, but Stiglitz regards Piketty and Saez's work high enough that he writes multiple essays on how important it is. After this, there are multiple essays on the economic consequences of inequality. (That phrase is a reference to Keynes' Economic Consequences of the Peace.) There's a lot to talk about here, and Stiglitz touches on a wide spectrum without diluting his message too much. One major component is that income inequality lowers aggregate demand, thus preventing economic recovery. Not to mention all the externalities such as social mobility, health, and educational status. Even the IMF, hardly a collection of economic radicals, acknowledges the damages of income inequality. His policy suggestions are simple to explain, have a sound theoretical and historical backing, and have worked to some degree in the past. They are also damn near politically impossible. These include a return to improved market competition by breaking apart the worst monopolies, avoiding the extremes of rent-seeking intellectual property laws, reinstating the separation between investment and savings banks as seen in Glass-Steagall, and a social safety net to protect the poorest from the vagaries of market forces. These essays show comprehensive understanding of what the problem is, and some suggestions of what needs to be done. It's a Greatest Hits selection from Stiglitz. You likely know how this goes already, but it's important to understand the ideas in his own words.


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