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《Preloved Paperback + A New Generation of Army Of “Makers/Startups” Using The Web’s Technology Innovation Model Will Help Drive The Next Big Wave In Global Economy》Chris Anderson - MAKERS : The New Industrial Revolution (2012 Edition)

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1 month ago by trustexplatform

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This preloved international bestseller is actually in good condition and nicely wrapped with protective book-wrapper. Noted That there are yellowing dots appearance on content pages with no tears. Makers: The New Industrial Revolution is the third book written by Chris Anderson, Editor in chief of Wired magazine. He is also the author of “The Long Tail”. Wired magazine editor and bestselling author, 3D Robotics co-founder and bestselling author Chris Anderson takes you to the front lines of a new industrial revolution as today’s entrepreneurs, using open source design and 3-D printing, bring manufacturing to the desktop. In an age of custom-fabricated, do-it-yourself product design and creation, the collective potential of a million garage tinkerers and enthusiasts is about to be unleashed, driving a resurgence of American manufacturing. A generation of “Makers” using the Web’s innovation model will help drive the next big wave in the global economy, as the new technologies of digital design and rapid prototyping gives everyone the power to invent--creating “the long tail of things”. If a country wants to remain economically vibrant, it needs to manufacture things. In recent years, however, many nations have become obsessed with making money out of selling services, leaving the real business of manufacturing to others. Makers is about how all that is being reversed. Over the past ten years, the internet has democratised publishing, broadcasting and communications, leading to a massive increase in the range of participation in everything digital - the world of bits. Now the same is happening to manufacturing - the world of things. Chris Anderson, explains how this is happening: how such technologies as 3D printing and electronics assembly are becoming available to everybody, and how people are building successful businesses as a result. Whereas once every aspiring entrepreneur needed the support of a major manufacturer, now anybody with a smart idea and a little expertise can make their ideas a reality. Just as Google, Facebook and others have created highly successful companies in the virtual world, so these new inventors and manufacturers are assuming positions of ever greater importance in the real world. The next industrial revolution is on its way. We’re now entering the third industrial revolution, Anderson said. The first one, which began with the spinning jenny in 1776, doubled the human life span and set population soaring. From the demographic perspective, "it’s as if nothing happened before the Industrial Revolution." The next revolution was digital. Formerly industrial processes like printing were democratized with desktop publishing. The "cognitive surplus" of formerly passive consumers was released into an endless variety of personal creativity. Then distribution was democratized by the Web, which is "scale agnostic and credentials agnostic." Anyone can potentially reach 7 billion people. The third revolution is digital manufacturing, which combines the gains of the first two revolutions. Factory robots, which anyone can hire, have become general purpose and extremely fast. They allow "lights-out manufacturing," that goes all night and all weekend. "This will reverse the arrow of globalization," Anderson said. "The centuries of quest for cheaper labor is over. Labor arbitrage no longer drives trade." The advantages of speed and flexibility give the advantage to "locavore" manufacturing because "Closer is faster." Innovation is released from the dead weight of large-batch commitments. Designers now can sit next to the robots building their designs and make adjustments in real time. In an age of custom-fabricated, do-it-yourself product design and creation, the collective potential of a million garage tinkerers and enthusiasts is about to be unleashed, driving a resurgence of American manufacturing. "Inspiring and engaging. Anderson delivers a compelling blueprint of a future where America can lead in making things again." --Elon Musk, co-fouder of Tesla Motors and CEO of SpaceX ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Review From The Guardian : Chris Anderson's vision of the future involves us all becoming manufacturers With its subtitle heralding "The New Industrial Revolution", this is a book that never knowingly undersells itself. Every page and every paragraph rams home the same basic message: this is what the future looks like. The good news is that manufacturing is coming back. The bad news – at least for arty-farty types like your reviewer – is that we're going to be doing the manufacturing ourselves. Not in factories, of course, because that's so 20th century, but in our own homes. According to Chris Anderson, editor-in-chief of culture and technology magazine Wired, we will all learn to design our own products using universal software, and then either construct them with "3D printers" that inject plastic mouldings or email our designs to a fabrication unit that will make them for us. "We are all designers now," he writes. "It's time to get good at it." Thus a new cottage industry will grow that will rebalance a global economy distorted by cheap labour costs. In this revolution, claims Anderson, the workers will finally own the means of production. Innovation will thrive, excellence will prevail, inward-looking companies will be replaced by outward-looking communities, and all will be for the best in the best of all possible worlds. Anderson is no stranger to this Panglossian brand of futurology. He is himself a mini-cottage industry, turning trend-spotting into popular economic manifestos. In his first book, The Long Tail, Anderson argued that the internet had created a new business landscape, in which success meant selling less of more. It became the marketing mantra for every company that dreamed of high revenue from low sales. His second book, Free, took counterintuition one step further by asserting that giving products and services away for nothing would lead to long-term profit. Although the book was offered as a free download, its thesis didn't find many buyers. As with comedy, the secret of futurology is timing, and 2009 was not the year to preach a cavalier attitude to debt. The economic meltdown raised profound suspicions about the internet's intangibility, the ethereal limitlessness that seemed to encourage folly and excess. After all, Alan Greenspan thought "advances in technology" could secure endless credit. In Makers, Anderson plugs into a widespread desire to return to the material world of "atoms". The book is based on a 2010 article Anderson wrote for Wired entitled "In the next industrial revolution atoms are the new bits". The idea is that bits are software and atoms hardware. Up until recently, goes the theory, computer technology had enabled hardware controlled by corporations – books, newspapers, CDs etc – to be replaced by software that can be used by everyone. The next stage of this process, Anderson contends, is to use software to manufacture our own hardware. He cites the "maker movement" as the vanguard of industrial DIY. These designers and hobbyists are already using open-resource software and state-of-the-art technology (such as 3D printers) to create products that were once the preserve of corporate factories. Anderson compares the movement to Silicon Valley's Homebrew Computer Club, from which people such as Steve Jobs emerged. "The internet democratised publishing, broadcasting and communications," he writes, "and the consequence was a massive increase in the range of both participation and participants in everything digital. Now the same is happening to manufacturing – the Long Tail of things." Perhaps. But is that necessarily a cause for celebration? You could replace the word "democratised" with "devastated" and that first sentence wouldn't suffer much of a drop in factuality. Just ask bookshops and the newspaper industry. For who has really been empowered? The masses, or Apple, Google and Amazon? Nor is it the case that democratisation has effected a dramatic change in the patterns of consumption – the bestsellers remain bestsellers, and the non-sellers disappear into depths. For every Fifty Shades of Grey, there are a million shades of obscurity. By the same token, might not a possible scenario be that DIY manufacturing leads to a few individual successes and a mass of unwanted vanity projects? Still, it seems churlish to raise such quibbles in the face of Anderson's relentlessly upbeat prose. His book is filled with stories of unlikely characters taking a risk, showing what they can do, and coming out on top of new billion-dollar companies. And it's written in that jaunty, easy-to-understand style that American magazine writers do so well. But not so well that I really grasp what a "CAD program" is or, indeed, how a 3D printer actually works. For those of us still struggling to master inkjet printers, the future does not look very bright at all. About the Author CHRIS ANDERSON is the CEO and co-founder of 3D Robotics, a fast-growing manufacturer of aerial robots, and DIY Drones. He was the editor in chief of Wired until 2012, during which, he led the magazine to multiple National Magazine Award nominations, as well as winning the prestigious top prize for General Excellence in 2005, 2007, and 2009. In 2009, the magazine was named Magazine of the Decade by the editors of AdWeek. Anderson is the author of the New York Times bestseller The Long Tail and Free: The Future of a Radical Price. He lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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