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    # Highly Recommended《Bran-New + 2016 Hardcover Edition + Powerful And Transformative System For Hatching Ideas, Solving Problems and Testing Solution 》Jake Knapp - SPRINT : How to Solve Big Problems And Test New Ideas In Just Five Days

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    This New York Times & The Wall Street Journal bestseller in hardcover edition is a bran-new book and still wrapped with new- book plastic wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM120.54. Now here Only at RM33. Sprint is a book about surprising ideas: that the biggest challenges require less time, not more; that individuals produce better solutions than teams; and that you can test anything in one week by building a realistic façade. Sprint offers a transformative formula for testing ideas that works whether you're at a STARUP , small business or a large organization. Within five days, you'll move from idea to prototype to decision, saving you and your team countless hours and countless dollars. From three partners at Google Ventures, a unique five-day process for solving tough business problems, proven at more than 100 companies. A must read for entrepreneurs of all stripes." --Eric Ries, author of The Lean Startup "The key to success, often, is building the right habits. But which habits work best? Sprint offers powerful methods for hatching ideas, solving problems, testing solutions--and finding those small, correct habits that make all the right behaviors fall in place." -- Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit From three partners at Google Ventures, a unique five-day process for solving tough problems, proven at more than a hundred companies. Entrepreneurs and leaders face big questions every day: What's the most important place to focus your effort, and how do you start? What will your idea look like in real life? How many meetings and discussions does it take before you can be sure you have the right solution? Now there's a surefire way to answer these important questions: the sprint. Designer Jake Knapp created the five-day process at Google, where sprints were used on everything from Google Search to Google X. He joined Braden Kowitz and John Zeratsky at Google Ventures, and together they have completed more than a hundred sprints with companies in mobile, e-commerce, healthcare, finance, and more. A practical guide to answering critical business questions, Sprint is a book for teams of any size, from small startups to Fortune 100s, from teachers to nonprofits. It's for anyone with a big opportunity, problem, or idea who needs to get answers today. The companies that Google Ventures invest in face big questions every day: ● Where’s the most important place to focus your effort, and how do you start? ● What will your ideas look like in real life? ● How many meetings and discussions does it take before you can be sure you have the right solution to a problem? Business owners and investors want their companies and the people who lead them to be equipped to answer these questions—and quickly. And now there’s a sure-fire way to solve their problems and test solutions: the sprint. While working at Google, designer Jake Knapp created a unique problem-solving method that he coined a “design sprint”—a five-day process to help companies answer crucial questions. His “sprints” were used in the development of everything from Gmail to Google X to Chrome. When he moved to Google Ventures, he joined Braden Kowitz and John Zeratsky, both designers and partners there who have worked on numerous products, including the YouTube redesign. Together Knapp, Zeratsky, and Kowitz have run over 100 sprints with their portfolio companies, inside Google and in others companies or environments who have sought their help. They’ve seen firsthand how sprints can overcome challenges in all kinds of companies: healthcare, fitness, finance, retailers, and more. Sprint takes you behind the scenes with some of America's most fascinating startups as they sprint on difficult problems. You'll meet a hotel robotics maker searching for the perfect robot personality, an innovative coffee roaster expanding to new markets, a company organizing the world's cancer data, and Slack, the fastest-growing business app in history. A practical guide to answering business questions, Sprint is a book for groups of any size, from small startups to Fortune 100s, from teachers and PTAs to nonprofits and public institutions. It’s for anyone with a big opportunity, problem, or idea who needs to get answers today. One of the great things about this book is that it takes some of the core aspects of agile/lean methodology but boils them into a pragmatic and useful framework. Focusing on a smaller autonomous team with clear objectives and small batch sizes sounds like a framework for an agile development team, but in this case those concepts are utilized for rapid focused innovation. The examples covered in this book are also excellent. In so many books, the examples are somewhat bland and not directly applicable to the reader. However, that was not the case here. Jake did an amazing job helping you understand the challenges that these organizations were facing. Many of these organizations were ones that I heard of or dealt with directly. Applicable examples are essential in a book like this. Highlights: 1. The book gives great advice on structuring the team when executing these rapid innovation sprints. Jake lays out a lot of good techniques here including always having the decider in the room as well as the troublemaker. "And if your Decider doesn't believe the sprint will be worthwhile? If she won't even stop for a cameo? Hold up! That's a giant red flag. You might have the wrong project. Take your time, talk with the Decider, and figure out which big challenge would be better." (p. 32) 2. Another benefit was seeing the activities that are undertaken during this sprint. For example, the process of creating a customer-centric map (in Chapter 5) to illustrate the key actors and story lines is particularly useful in helping teams break down the overall complexity. In addition, simple exercises like the How Might We exercise (Chapter 6) are common tools that can be used outside of the bounds of the innovation sprint. 3. Allowing participants in the sprint to maximize both group brainstorming as well as individual time for coming up with a solution was great. Some exercises like the Crazy 8's (in Chapter 9) are helpful at providing rapid iterations in a short period of time. The techniques presented that maintained the momentum of the sprint and minimized unnecessary discussion were also solid gold. "Each person believed his or her own idea could work. And each person could have spent an hour explaining why. But if we had to spend an hour discussing each idea, the whole day could have gone by without any clear conclusion." 4. One aspect that I loved was the focus on testing with real target users at the end of the week. There is a good amount of knowledge on how to best perform user interviews (Chapter 15) that will be immensely helpful if the concept is new to you. The only site that goes with the book also provides a video of one of the interviews taking place. "In Friday's test, customer reactions are solid gold, but their feedback is worth pennies on the dollar." (p. 169-170) Closing Thoughts Even if you never implement this rigid one week innovation sprint, the techniques included in the book can be applied across a wide variety of scenarios. However, I think many organizations will be spurred to try the one week framework to solve a complex issue after reading through this book. This book does an absolutely amazing job of spurring action quickly and providing insightful case studies. I think you will love it. ------------------------------------------------------ HUFFPOST Review : This blog will teach you the process of running a “design sprint” – a method developed by Jake Knapp, a partner at Google Ventures – to solve big problems and test new ideas in just five days. Most teams often invest months, even years, in developing a product or service — only to discover they’ve built something that no one wants. Jake developed a method that helps teams make better use of time and resources by simulating the entire product development process in just five days. A design sprint helps teams filter ideas and gain clarity as to which of them are best to pursue. Let’s dive in and see what that process looks like at a high level, and how to implement it. For more a more detailed, step-by-step process, check out Jake’s book. Preparing for the Sprint To kick-off a design sprint, your goal is to assemble a diverse team from within your company of five to eight experts in different areas of the business. Jake notes that the sweet spot here is seven people — any more will only “create drag.” An ideal team involves representation from the engineering, sales, customer support and marketing departments, as well as, critically, “the Decision Maker.” Each person brings a key understanding to the process: engineering understands product capabilities, sales understands customer preferences, customer support sees customer challenges, and marketing holds key insights that tie it all together. Over the course of the next five days, the team will develop and test a number of different things. You can run sprints on key features (What should my landing page look like? How should we price it?), product variations (Do people prefer this type of product or something else?), or entirely new businesses (Does this business solve a key problem for a customer? Are they willing to pay for this product?). Here’s how the five key days play out… Day 1: Monday — Map and Define the Problem Day 1 is about defining the problem you want to solve. The decisionmaker in the group should facilitate the agreement around a long-term goal. What the company or product should achieve in, say, eight months’ time. Make sure everyone is aligned and excited about this goal, write it down and post it on the wall. Then, map out a series of difficult questions, potential barriers to achieving that goal: ➽ What are the technical and market risks? ➽ What if people don’t care about it? ➽ What if they won’t use it? ➽ What might they not trust? After you’ve mapped out the questions, spend time trying to answer the most important of them based on the information you know. Next, brainstorm and list as many different types of customers (demographics) that you believe have the problem you are trying to solve. Now pick one (either the one you best understand or the largest cohort). This is the customer for whom you are going to be (designing) running the design sprint. Based on this understanding, one team member is next assigned to recruit five real potential customers who fit these characteristics from outside the company. These five people will be asked to physically show up on Friday to test the product you’re designing. Why five? Back in the 90s, Jakob Nielsen did a study to answer this question: “How many interviews does it take to spot the most important patterns?” It turns out that 85 percent of the problems were observed after just FIVE people reviewed a product! Additionally, the deadline of actual customers coming in five days creates an added incentive to have a workable product finished by then. The team’s last task for Day 1 is to Ask the Experts. Somebody out in the world knows “the most” about your customers; somebody knows the most about the technology, the marketing channels, the business, and so on. Your goal is to find them and pick their brains. This is usually where people find the most exciting ideas. Day 2: Tuesday — Create Solutions Jake compares ideas in product design to LEGO bricks: they can be combined and recombined in new ways to create something better. On Day 2, the team first sketches (literally, on large sticky notes) competitors’ solutions and puts them up on the wall for everyone to see. Next, each team member sketches new solutions that combine these “LEGO bricks” to address the problem identified on Day 1. Each person does their sketching on their own and submits their sketches anonymously. Each member can submit one, two or even three solutions. This individual process prevents the groupthink that occurs with traditional brainstorming. The goal is for each individual to create fully fleshed out ideas, empowering introverted team members to contribute equally. Note: You need to be quite thorough with these sketches — they should illustrate how the solution would work for the target customer, what the customer sees going through the app or website, and so on… They can be rough, but they should be very detailed and precise. Day 3: Wednesday — Downselect Suspense is high coming in on Wednesday morning. The team tapes up sketches and everyone marks their favorite ideas with a dot. The team engages in a timed critique of each concept. Interestingly, the person who sketched it isn’t allowed to speak until the end. This minimizes bias and ensures the process is truly meritocratic, allowing people to be as honest as possible with their critique. In a group of seven sprint participants, there may be anywhere from seven to 15 proposed storyboard solutions. The team votes on the solutions they believe in and are most excited about testing. The clincher, however, is that The Decision Maker casts “super-votes,” which supersede all other votes, choosing up to three solutions to test fully on Friday. Ideally, though, you pick the best single prototype to answer the question you defined at the beginning of the week. Next, create a storyboard. The team should flesh out the top idea(s), detailing everything from discovery (i.e. how a user comes across the product for the first time — for example, on a store shelf, via a web search or news article) to every other part of the user experience. In other words, this storyboard needs to be able to stand alone without a verbal explanation, so it may be evaluated in an unbiased manner, on their merits alone, not based on who created the storyboard. The next step is to take the idea beyond the storyboard and transform it into a high-resolution mockup that looks and feels like an actual product. Day 4: Thursday — Put It All Together & Build the Mockup Once the team has an idea of how everything will look and feel, they assign tasks to different team members to build a prototype. A good rule of thumb is: Build just enough to learn, but not more... These prototypes don’t have to be fully functional, but they should look like they are. Buttons might not fully work, but when pressed should drive the customer down a different path… Jake calls this “Goldilocks Quality” – the prototype should have just enough quality to evoke honest reactions from customers. After team members build their mockup, the team regroups to connect the pieces and flesh out the full experience they want to put their five clients through tomorrow. They need to assure everything appears realistic and cohesive. Day 5: Friday — Observe Customer Reactions (and Learn!) Day 5 is when the real fun begins – you get detailed and authentic feedback from real customers. The five people you recruited on Day 1 have shown up to test the product/prototype. It’s best to bring them in face-to-face to test the product in person if possible, though videoconferencing can suffice in some cases. Identify “The Interviewer” on your team – this person will interact one-on-one with your customer, who is testing the product. The rest of your design team observes customer reactions via live video in a separate room. The Interviewer asks the customer different questions (you should write a script): ➽ What do you think about what just happened? ➽ How would you compare the different options? ➽ What worked? ➽ What didn’t? ➽ Would you buy this? CRITICALLY — The team observes customer reactions, rather than listens to feedback. This ensures that the insights they glean are as honest as possible. By the end of this observation, you should be able to see patterns. You’ll know what’s working well and resonating, and what’s confusing and what people don’t care about. These insights answer some of the larger questions posed at the beginning of the sprint and inform the direction that the team will head in next. This knowledge is extremely valuable and gathering it now will save you an incredible amount of time and money later. What does this mean for you? Design sprints are an essential tool that entrepreneurs can use to fail fast, rapidly iterate and grow quickly. For me it’s part of my year-long exploration of how to best ‘experiment’ in building my businesses, products and services. Working in a group environment successfully is difficult and, as Jake mentioned, A crucial, but overlooked, part of the design process is designing the way in which we work together. The structured design sprint process enables teams to operate in ways that are effective in gleaning real, actionable insights about what works and what doesn’t. It empowers individuals with crazy ideas and also squashes ideas that aren’t validated by customers. If your team is grappling with whether to launch a new feature or product, it’s worth giving a design sprint a try. You’ll be amazed by the results. ABOUT AUTHORS : Jake Knapp created the Google Ventures sprint process and has run more than a hundred sprints with startups such as 23andme, Slack, Nest, and Foundation Medicine. Previously, Jake worked at Google, leading sprints for everything from Gmail to Google X. He is currently among the world’s tallest designers. John Zeratsky has designed mobile apps, medical reports, and a daily newspaper (among other things). Before joining Google Ventures, he was a design lead at YouTube and an early employee of FeedBurner, which Google acquired in 2007. John writes about design and productivity for Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, and Wired. He studied journalism at the University of Wisconsin Braden Kowitz founded the Google Ventures design team in 2009 and pioneered the role of “design partner” at a venture capital firm. He has advised close to two hundred startups on product design, hiring, and team culture. Before joining Google Ventures, Braden led design for several Google products, including Gmail, Google Apps for Business, Google Spreadsheets, and Google Trends.

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