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# Highly Recommended《Bran-New + 2016 Hardcover Edition + Uncover The Logic, Aesthetics, And Mysteries Of The Internet》Virginia Heffernan - MAGIC AND LOSS : The Internet as Art

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This New York Times bestseller in hardcover edition is a bran-new book and nicely wrapped with protective book-wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM114.66(Hardcover). Now here Only at RM30. Just as Susan Sontag did for photography and Marshall McLuhan did for television, Virginia Heffernan (called one of the “best living writers of English prose”) reveals the logic and aesthetics behind the Internet. Since its inception, the Internet has morphed from merely an extension of traditional media into its own full-fledged civilization. It is among mankind’s great masterpieces—a massive work of art. As an idea, it rivals monotheism. We all inhabit this fascinating place. But its deep logic, its cultural potential, and its societal impact often elude us. In this deep and thoughtful book, Virginia Heffernan presents an original and far-reaching analysis of what the Internet is and does. Life online, in the highly visual, social, portable, and global incarnation rewards certain virtues. The new medium favors speed, accuracy, wit, prolificacy, and versatility, and its form and functions are changing how we perceive, experience, and understand the world. Magic and Loss views the internet as a collective endeavor that has developed into a “masterpiece of human civilization” alongside “the pyramid, the aqueduct, the highway, the novel, the newspaper.” Heffernan sees the Internet as art—something that will one day define humanity in its utility and design—and uses her incredible intellect and dexterity with words to reveal exactly why Twitter should be considered poetry, or why Kindles don’t signal the end of books, but rather the endurance of reading. And as the title suggests, she not only beautifully elucidates every aspects of the Internet’s intangible, indelible magic, but also what’s been lost with its rise. There’s a distinct nostalgia for the past—handwritten letters, uncompressed audio, landline calls—but as she points out, any transformation is not possible without some kind of sacrifice. But, as Heffernan argues, it is not just impressive in magnitude, it is also a record of the world as we know it—a “grand emotional, sensory, and intellectual adventure.” As such, Heffernan deems it “a massive and collaborative work of realist art”—and as a work of art, it can be best understood using the tools of cultural criticism. This is the aim of her book: to apply the interpretive tools that we have already developed for traditional art to “build a complete aesthetics—and poetics—of the Internet.” ------------------------------------------------ KIRKUS REVIEW New York Times Magazine writer Heffernan considers the mighty Internet in all its terrible beauty and power. As a member of a pre-millennial generation that can rightly say its maturation process paralleled the Internet’s own, the author is in excellent position to declare early on, “if it’s ever fair to say that anything has ‘changed everything,’ it’s fair to say so about the Internet.” Heffernan’s digital odyssey began personally and warmly in the glow of an inchoate social networking platform at Dartmouth College called “Conference XYZ,” which the author used while still a preteen. The ensuing decades have only served to deepen the author’s initial wonder with the Internet. Deeply contemplating the aesthetic meaning behind the Internet’s early interface, Heffernan exercises the same sort of intellectual curiosity more commonly ascribed to things like string theory and quantum physics. She similarly treats popular time killers like “Angry Birds” and “Frisbee.” “But when things settle down in reality, the Frisbee game is too exciting,” writes the author. “It does nothing to teach the all-important patience and tolerance for boredom that are central to learning.” The author’s cerebral, literary approach also informs her discussion of YouTube’s inaugural clip from 2005, titled “Me At The Zoo,” in which one of the site’s founders vaguely talks about elephants at the San Diego Zoo. Heffernan, however, is also sober about the Internet’s negative aspects. At one point, she calls it a “graphic mess…designed to weaken, confound, and pickpocket you.” Still, the author steadfastly defends the Internet from myopic critics who are all too happy to jeer it. “Asking what’s to become of poetry in the age of Twitter is like asking what will become of music in the age of guitars,” she writes. In melding the personal with the increasingly universal, Heffernan delivers a highly informative analysis of what the Internet is—and can be. A thoroughly engrossing examination of the Internet’s past, present, and future. ----------------------------------------------------- “ Magic and Loss is the book we—or at least I—have been waiting for, the book that Internet culture, and the way it’s changed the expression and reception of art, language, and ideas, deserves and demands. Virginia Heffernan argues that the Internet, broadly conceived, is a ‘massive and collaborative work of realist art,’ and she illuminates it with the best sort of cultural criticism—humane, personal, and extremely smart, with a frame of references that includes St. Thomas Aquinas, Liz Phair, Richard Rorty, Beyoncé, and the pairing of Dante and Steve Jobs, two ‘labile romantics.’ Whether writing about how the Kindle changed reading, how the iPod and iPhone changed listening, or how the demise of landline telephones changed communicating, Heffernan goes right to the heart of the lived experience... Virginia Heffernan quotes Harold Bloom to the effect that ‘to behold is a tragic posture; to observe is an ethical one.’ In Magic and Loss, she observes, in the best sense of the word.” -- Ben Yagoda, author of The B-Side and How to Not Write Bad About the Author Virginia Heffernan writes regularly about digital culture for The New York Times Magazine. In 2005, Heffernan (with cowriter Mike Albo) published the cult comic novel The Underminer (Bloomsbury). In 2002, she received her PhD in English Literature from Harvard.

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