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    # Highly Recommended《Bran-New + 2017 The Richest Man In The World + The Biography & The Making of Amazon Founder》Brad Stone - THE EVERYTHING STORE: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon

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    ★★★★A Must-Read For All Online Platform Startup★★★★ This award-winning international bestseller in paperback edition is a bran-new book and still wrapped with new-book plastic wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM39.90. Now here Only at RM17. Winner of the 2013 Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award Chosen as a Best Book of 2013 by The Washington Post, Forbes, The New Republic, and Gizmodo, and as one of the Top 10 Investigative Journalism Books of 2013 by Nieman Reports JEFF BEZOS NET WORTH — as of 1/26/18 : $114.7 Billion ➽ Amazon's chief Jeff Bezos briefly topped Forbes' ranks of the world's richest in July 2017, as his online retailer's stock surged. ➽ He owns nearly 17% of Amazon, which he founded in a garage in Seattle in 1994. ➽ Bezos attended Princeton and worked at a hedge fund before quitting to sell books online. ➽ His other passion is space travel: His aerospace company, Blue Origin, is developing a reusable rocket that Bezos says will carry passengers. ➽ Bezos purchased The Washington Post in 2013 for $250 million. “The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon” is a 2013 book written by journalist Brad Stone. It documents the rise of Amazon.com. While a bestseller it received its first one-star review on Amazon from MacKenzie Bezos, wife of Jeff Bezos, claiming many inaccuracies in her extensive review, while pointing out only one, the timing of Jeff Bezos reading the novel Remains of the Day.Stone was allowed access to many current and former Amazon executives, but not to Jeff Bezos himself The definitive story of Amazon.com, one of the most successful companies in the world, and of its driven, brilliant founder, Jeff Bezos. Amazon.com started off delivering books through the mail. But its visionary founder, Jeff Bezos, wasn't content with being a bookseller. He wanted Amazon to become the everything store, offering limitless selection and seductive convenience at disruptively low prices. To do so, he developed a corporate culture of relentless ambition and secrecy that's never been cracked. Until now. Brad Stone enjoyed unprecedented access to current and former Amazon employees and Bezos family members, giving readers the first in-depth, fly-on-the-wall account of life at Amazon. Compared to tech's other elite innovators--Jobs, Gates, Zuckerberg--Bezos is a private man. But he stands out for his restless pursuit of new markets, leading Amazon into risky new ventures like the Kindle and cloud computing, and transforming retail in the same way Henry Ford revolutionized manufacturing. THE EVERYTHING STORE will be the revealing, definitive biography of the company that placed one of the first and largest bets on the Internet and forever changed the way we shop and read. If you enjoy business books, the Everything Store is perfect. An online bookstore headquartered in a Washington garage in 1994 is now considered by many to be the most innovative company in the world. The Everything Store perfectly encapsulates the culture that Jeff Bezos wanted and the journey through some of the brightest innovations all derived from the Amazon Mission: ● be earth's most customer-centric company; ● to build a place where people can come to find and discover anything they might want to buy online. As much as this book gives a historical overview it also informs, by highlighting the key principles that guide the entire organization and these principles can also be applied to other organizations. For example, a relentless focus on the Customer by all employees drives the mission forward and that in parallel with long-term thinking at the crossroads of all decision-making fosters BIG thinking that delights the customer and that is one of the foundational elements to how Amazon became the "Everything Store" - this is also what will inspire future selection that many can't imagine possible. Brad Stone could not have been more precise in painting the picture of Amazon's journey and guiding light while giving readers a framework for what the future holds for Bezos and the entire Amazon ecosystem. ------------------------------------------------- 5 habits from billionaire Jeff Bezos that can help anyone advance their career (Bisiness Insider) : ① He puts customers at the center During an interview with 60 Minutes, Jeff Bezos was asked why he was willing to sacrifice company profits, and by extension shareholder satisfaction, in order to focus on making Amazon increasingly customer-centric. He said, "In the long run, if you take care of customers, that is taking care of shareholders." Unlike most organizations, Amazon ignored cries from investors to become profitable right away, and instead invested in customer-centric improvements that helped the company become one of the most valuable on the planet in the long run. In 2014 for example, Amazon's shares took a 10 percent hit after an earnings report showed the company was not profitable. But rather than listen to naysayers, Amazon instead invested more money in building additional fulfillment centers that would allow for faster delivery. Since 2014, Amazon's stock has increased roughly 285 percent. ② He puts a focus on innovation How many ecommerce websites invest millions of dollars into a secretive skunkworks organization designed to develop moonshot projects? The answer is not many. But Amazon developed Lab126 to do exactly that. Lab126 has developed a number of category defining products. From the Kindle to the Echo, the ecommerce giant uses innovation to improve customer experience and to break into new markets. Amazon Web Services (AWS) is another example of Amazon's intense focus on innovation. AWS provides the backbone for over 100,000 companies and government agencies including Netflix and the CIA. Soon, Amazon will roll out another innovation designed to improve customer experience while lowering costs: Drone delivery. Autonomous Octocopters are expected to launch as soon as 2019. Customers will be able to receive a delivery for items up to 5 pounds - which constitutes 86 percent of Amazon's items - in 30 minutes. ③ He hires rigorously Bezos is a believer in technological innovation, and as a result, he encourages his company to hire only the best and most creative minds. Amazon's hiring process is notoriously rigorous. This ensures that each new employee is capable of advancing the company's mission of developing disruptive products and services that improve customer experience. As Mr. Bezos wrote in his 1998 letter to shareholders, "Setting the bar high in our approach to hiring has been, and will be, the single most important element of Amazon.com's success." ④ He spends money on the right things During a 1999 interview, Bob Simon questioned Jeff Bezos about his desk. It was a door with four rickety wooden legs bolted and taped together. Bezos responded that the desk "[was] a symbol of spending money on things that matter to customers and not spending money on things that don't." Cost reduction remains an important component of Amazon's company culture. In fact, employees who are able to identify areas of major savings are awarded the "Door Desk Award," which is given in recognition of innovative cost savings that will allow Amazon to offer customers more competitive prices as a result. ⑤ He has an unyielding work ethic Jeff Bezos understands that Amazon is fighting an existential battle each and every day. In an interview previously cited he said, "companies have short lifespans and Amazon will be disrupted someday." Bezos has created a company that prizes work ethic. In fact, the company culture has received mixed reviews because of how hard many employees are asked to work. For some workers, expectations were unreasonable, for others, the high-pressure environment encouraged them to do their best. By developing a company culture that prizes innovative minds who are willing to work long hours to tackle challenging problems, Amazon is more capable of fending off disruption by competitors. It's a company culture that prizes intelligence, customer satisfaction, and hard work. This has propelled Amazon to become a goliath in the mere twenty-three years since it was founded in a modest ranch home in 1994. -------------------------------------------------- Financial Times Review : Seventeen years ago, as Jeff Bezos’s Amazon.com raised $8m in venture capital at a valuation of $60m – it now has a market capitalisation of $150bn – a 23-year-old temporary worker in its Seattle warehouse mislaid his car. Christopher Smith was working so furiously around the clock as Amazon grew that post piled up unopened in his apartment and he forgot he had left his Peugeot in a no-parking zone. When he finally opened his mail, he found several parking tickets, a notice that it had been towed away, and a letter telling him that the car had been sold at auction for $700, and he owed $1,800 in unpaid fines. Amazon was then a tiny company, started in Seattle by an intensely driven, scarily bright 31-year-old who had been working at a Wall Street hedge fund called DE Shaw & Co when he spotted the potential of the internet. He had the idea for an online retailer that could become the digital equivalent of Montgomery Ward, the mail-order and department-store business. He called it “the everything store”. It says something that one of Bezos’s first ideas for its name was Relentless.com (which still takes you to Amazon if you type it into a web browser). His unbounded drive and ambition has pushed his company through doldrums, diversions, failed ideas and a near-death financial crisis to become something remarkably like the outfit he first envisaged at DE Shaw. The outlines of the Bezos story – the drive west from Texas to Seattle with his wife MacKenzie in his father’s Chevrolet, the decision to start out with an online bookstore, his weird, booming laugh – are familiar. Anyone who wishes to dig deeper must penetrate the force field of secrecy that Bezos, a teenage Star Trek fan, erects to frustrate his competitors and shape his image. Brad Stone, a technology journalist who first covered Amazon in 2000, has done a remarkable job in The Everything Store, in a way that Bezos would appreciate – by working very hard. He has talked to many of those who knew and worked with Bezos from the early days, and even tracked down his biological father, who was divorced by his mother when he was a baby (Bezos is his stepfather’s name). “I thought he was a little bit crazy,” confesses one early employee. He is referring to a time when Amazon was offering 1.5m titles for sale on its website and had 40 books in its warehouse, but it is a fair assessment. Bezos mixes acute intelligence (and affability when relaxed) with touches of the psychopath. Not for nothing do Amazon executives call his screaming fits “nutters”. Stone recounts one incident when Bezos publicly humiliated a senior executive by calling Amazon’s number to check the man’s assertion that its phones were being picked up promptly. “Bezos took his watch off and made a deliberate show of tracking the time. A brutal minute passed, then two ... Bezos’s face grew red; the vein in his forehead, a hurricane warning system, popped out”. All of this, however, was to a purpose. Bezos was building a company that broke the rules of retailing – for example, by allowing hostile reviews of products that it sold. He was thinking and pushing his way into a world that he had envisaged in theory but had to forge in reality. “Jeff does a couple of things better than anyone I’ve ever worked for,” one executive told Stone. “He embraces the truth. A lot of people talk about the truth, but they don’t engage their decision-making around [it] ... The second thing is that he is not tethered by conventional thinking ... he is bound only by the laws of physics. He can’t change those. Everything else, he views as open to discussion.” “Physically, I’m a chicken. Mentally, I’m bold,” is Bezos’s self-assessment. His formidable appetite for risk-taking has been necessary since Amazon’s success was far from assured. Stone recounts how Bezos, discussing the book, asked him: “How do you plan to handle the narrative fallacy?” He meant the author Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s term for the urge to weave a simple story from complex events. Amazon was so overstretched by explosive growth at first that it could easily have collapsed; many of Bezos’s initiatives, such as his effort to build an Amazon search engine, have failed and been shut down; the company could have run out of cash in the dotcom bust of the early 2000s. Yet he made enough good decisions and executed them well enough to shrug the rest off. As with other entrepreneurs, it is a bit of a mystery where this talent and focus sprang from. Discussing Bezos’s separation from his father, Stone notes that both Steve Jobs of Apple and Larry Ellison of Oracle, two other technology founders, were adopted and “the experience is thought by some to have given each a powerful motivation to succeed”. He moves swiftly on, perhaps fearing a narrative fallacy. Bezos’s boldness did not simply create a new type of retailer. He has also been fearlessly long-term in his outlook, keeping Amazon’s margins low and its profits small at best while expanding its revenue base, from books into other physical goods and, with the Kindle, into digital information. It took a long time for investors to grasp the scale of his ambition. Bezos has shaped Amazon so forcefully, with such attention to detail, that it is uncertain how well the company can outlast him. The culture is eccentric, with meetings starting in silence as everyone reads a memo on the topic. With their tight discipline and reluctance to stray from the script, its executives behave like members of a cult. Yet Bezos created a company with sufficient momentum to knock over and digest everything in its path – book stores, speciality retailers, publishers. It is as hard to block as its founder. (John Gapper is the FT’s chief business commentator) About the Author Brad Stone has covered Amazon and technology in Silicon Valley for over 14 years, for publications such as Newsweek and the New York Times. He is currently a senior writer for Bloomberg Businessweek and lives in San Francisco, California.

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