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# Highly Recommended《Bran-New + Answer Questions on How & Why China Rise and Transform , What Does China Want ?》Orville Schell & John Delury - WEALTH AND POWER : China's Long March to the Twenty-First Century

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This New York Times and International bestseller in paperback edition is a bran-new book and nicely wrapped with protective book-wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM75.86. Now here Only at RM25. NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH “Informative and insightful . . . a must-read for anyone with an interest in the world’s fastest-rising superpower.” --Slate "Two leading experts on China outline a thought-provoking history that offers insight into the nation's future by evaluating its rise throughout the past 150 years, sharing lively portraits of key intellectual and political leaders to explain how China transformed from a country under foreign assault to a world giant." Through a series of lively and absorbing portraits of iconic modern Chinese leaders and thinkers, two of today’s foremost specialists on China provide a panoramic narrative of this country’s rise to preeminence that is at once analytical and personal. How did a nation, after a long and painful period of dynastic decline, intellectual upheaval, foreign occupation, civil war, and revolution, manage to burst forth onto the world stage with such an impressive run of hyperdevelopment and wealth creation—culminating in the extraordinary dynamism of China today? Wealth and Power answers this question by examining the lives of eleven influential officials, writers, activists, and leaders whose contributions helped create modern China. This fascinating survey begins in the lead-up to the first Opium War with Wei Yuan, the nineteenth-century scholar and reformer who was one of the first to urge China to borrow ideas from the West. It concludes in our time with human-rights advocate and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, an outspoken opponent of single-party rule. Along the way, we meet such titans of Chinese history as : ● the Empress Dowager Cixi, ● public intellectuals Feng Guifen, ● Liang Qichao, ● Chen Duxiu, ● Nationalist stalwarts Sun Yat-sen ● Chiang Kai-shek, ● Communist Party leaders Mao Zedong, ● Deng Xiaoping, ● and Zhu Rongji. The common goal that unites all of these disparate figures is their determined pursuit of fuqiang, “wealth and power.” This abiding quest for a restoration of national greatness in the face of a “century of humiliation” at the hands of the Great Powers came to define the modern Chinese character. It’s what drove both Mao and Deng to embark on root-and-branch transformations of Chinese society, first by means of Marxism-Leninism, then by authoritarian capitalism. And this determined quest remains the key to understanding many of China’s actions today. By unwrapping the intellectual antecedents of today’s resurgent China, Orville Schell and John Delury supply much-needed insight into the country’s tortured progression from nineteenth-century decline to twenty-first-century boom. By looking backward into the past to understand forces at work for hundreds of years, they help us understand China today and the future that this singular country is helping shape for all of us. This is a good history of China in the modern age told through the lives of its leaders and intellectuals. The aim of these people was to bring China, that traditional, classics bound kingdom, into the modern world, where it would not be so isolated, interact and profit from its neighbors and other countries, and improve the lives of its citizens. There were many ways this problem was thought out, and the authors take you pretty much into the thoughts and writings of the characters, one of whom is Mao Zedong, whose radical upheavals that killed millions were attempts to modernize China. But space is given to the charitable intellectuals and freedom fighters too. In fact, there is no one Chinese way of mind, no representative way of thinking. The country has had a long story; so too have the people been varied in thought and deed. This goes without saying, is glaringly obvious, but I bring it up only to diffuse ignorant stereotypes of China by the West. You could do well to start your course in Chinese culture and history with this book. The authors show how the encroachment of the Western empires and defeats at the hands of enemies within and without led, not just to the fall of the empire at the beginning of the twentieth century, but to the creation of a national mind-set that has kept the aim of achieving ‘wealth and power’ at the heart of Chinese politics ever since. The succession of military defeats and subsequent ‘unequal treaties’, which forced China to pay punitive reparations and give territory and access to foreign states, led to a spirit of ‘national humiliation’. Far from allowing this to become a negative factor, however, successive intellectuals and leaders used it as a spur to galvanise China into a process of ‘self-strengthening’. At the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth century, the main thrust was to borrow what was needed from the West in terms of technical and scientific knowledge, while maintaining the existing Confucian culture. But the authors show how, as that failed to make China strong enough to defy the many circling predators, gradually some intellectuals began to believe that there must be a period of ‘destruction’ of cultural sacred cows before ‘construction’ of a new and stronger state could begin. Each chapter focuses on one man, a leading intellectual or politician, taking us gradually through the decades from the end of the Opium wars to the present day. The emphasis is not on the events of any given period, although of course they are referenced and highlighted. Rather, the authors concentrate on the writings and speeches of each man, showing how each generation of political thought adopted, rejected or built on the ideas of the one before. The authors take a sympathetic approach to their subject – in the afterword they tell us that the book is part of a project undertaken by the Center on US-China Relations at the Asia Society in New York to examine China’s reform movement and transition to modernity. They attempt, successfully in my view, to explain to a Western audience the cultural differences that have enabled China to follow a path that seems, to our eyes, doomed to fail – to build a society that values the acquisition of ‘wealth and power’ above things that we see as essential for progress: intellectual freedom, human rights, democracy. While in no way condoning the horrors of the era of Mao Zedong and the Cultural Revolution, they suggest that this period of destructiveness may in fact have cleared the way, culturally, for the creation under Deng Xiaoping of the ‘Leninist capitalist’ system that has enabled China to become the powerhouse it is today. An unequal society, yes, and with repression still at its core, but a country governed largely with the consent of its people nonetheless. They end with some informed speculation about where next for China - having gained ‘wealth and power’ will they use that power to bully other nations as they were bullied in their nineteenth century weakness? Or will they, from a position of strength, continue to open up their society and perhaps gradually move towards an intellectual position and political system more closely aligned with the West? Personally, as an expat who lived in China for more than 15 years, I can say that, until now, I have not found any book about China to be very helpful. Most are negative, and view China through a western lens. None helped readers to understand the people or culture. This book is different. ➽ First, it is readable and interesting. ➽ Secondly, I thought it was a very balanced and thought-provoking account of modern China from the Opium wars to the present, seen from the point of view of some of the country's critical thinkers, with a balanced commentary by the author. I read it while in China, working throughout and some off-the-map (literally) rural areas. The book will help readers to understand what I was seeing and why and has put some context around my experiences that I have found very helpful, both personally and professionally. I highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in a balanced view of China and who wants to learn about the culture and history of this very interesting country. About the Author Orville Schell was educated at Harvard University and the University of California, Berkeley and is the author of numerous books and articles on China. The former dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at Berkeley, he is presently the Arthur Ross Director of the Center on U.S.-China Relations at the Asia Society in New York City. John Delury received his Ph.D. in modern Chinese history at Yale University, where he wrote his dissertation on the Ming-Qing Confucian scholar Gu Yanwu. He taught at Brown, Columbia, and Peking University, and was associate director of Asia Society’s Center on U.S.-China Relations. He is currently an assistant professor of East Asian studies at Yonsei University in Seoul.

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