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# Highly Recommended《Bran-New Hardcover + Discover The 10 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently》Scott Kaufman & Carolyn Gregoire - WIRED TO CREATE : UNRAVELING THE MYSTERIES OF THE CREATIVE MIND

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This New York Times bestseller in hardcover edition is a bran-new book and still wrapped with new-book plastic wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM116.02 (Hardcover). Now here Only at RM28. Is it possible to make sense of something as elusive as creativity? Based on psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman’s groundbreaking research and Carolyn Gregoire’s popular article in the Huffington Post, Wired to Create offers a glimpse inside the “messy minds” of highly creative people. Revealing the latest findings in neuroscience and psychology, along with engaging examples of artists and innovators throughout history, the book shines a light on the practices and habits of mind that promote creative thinking. Kaufman and Gregoire untangle a series of paradoxes— like mindfulness and daydreaming, seriousness and play, openness and sensitivity, and solitude and collaboration – to show that it is by embracing our own contradictions that we are able to tap into our deepest creativity. Each chapter explores one of the ten attributes and habits of highly creative people: ● Imaginative Play ● Passion ● Daydreaming ● Solitude ● Intuition ● Openness to Experience ● Mindfulness ● Sensitivity ● Turning Adversity into Advantage ● Thinking Differently With insights from the work and lives of Pablo Picasso, Frida Kahlo, Marcel Proust, David Foster Wallace, Thomas Edison, Josephine Baker, John Lennon, Michael Jackson, musician Thom Yorke, chess champion Josh Waitzkin, video-game designer Shigeru Miyamoto, and many other creative luminaries, Wired to Create helps us better understand creativity – and shows us how to enrich this essential aspect of our lives. You will enjoy reading this book; it is engaging, and full of intriguing information about creativity. Some of the information in this book is well-known and documented in other books. But you did learn a lot from this book, so you will definitely recommend it. The book is well organized in chapters that deal with factors that seem to contribute to creativity. These factors are: Imaginative play, passion, daydreaming, solitude, intuition, openness to experience, mindfulness, sensitivity, turning adversity into advantage, and thinking differently. Readers learned that creative minds are both messy and complex. Creativity is not the same as IQ. Creative writers score high in both tests for psychological health and in psychopathology! They are simultaneously mentally healthier and more mentally ill than the average person! George Bernard Shaw wrote, "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.". The book notes the importance of daydreaming for incubating new ideas. Also, interestingly, solitude is also important for creativity. Creative people are more sensitive to noises in the environment than most people. Some readers were particularly interested in what the book has to say about meditation. Focused meditation is actually detrimental to creativity, while open-monitoring meditation (tuning into one's own subjective experience) is helpful for fostering creativity. Readers thought it was especially intriguing that so many performers seem to show paradoxical behavior. When they are on stage, they appear to be extremely extroverted, but they are actually introverted, and quite sensitive. Backstage they are completely different from their onstage presence. In 1959, Isaac Asimov a wonderful essay about creativity. In it, he wrote, "The world in general disapproves of creativity." Asimov explains that we celebrate new original ideas only after they are widely accepted. Until then, we fear creative ideas, because they push us out of our "psychological comfort zone." Creative work can be dangerous, because we simultaneously admire and fear creativity. I was very impressed with the characteristics, and manifestations, of creativity in highly creative people. Though the book made us feel good about ourseves that we have all the ten traits that creative people tend to have, it also challenged us to do some things differently in my life. What most readers enjoyed most about this book, apart from it being full of inspiring, nonconformist thoughts in itself, is that it cited tons of research and case studies. There's a big difference between just telling us that creators have these ten qualities (imaginative play, sensitivity, etc.), and showing us a mass of data behind each of these ten qualities. The data and studies don't just substantiate the importance of these personality traits and behaviors; they make the author's points clearer, more interesting, and more convincing. The abundant number of case studies and research described were very intriguing to read! --------------------------------------------------- Review By Learning & the Brain® : “Contradict yourself!” Scott Barry Kaufman, scientific director of the Imagination Institute at the University of Pennsylvania, and Carolyn Gregoire, senior writer at the Huffington Post, offer that valuable piece of advice to those seeking to be creative. Their new book Wired to Create: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Creative Mind provides a compelling description of ten habits, skills, and personality dimensions of the creative person. This book, inspired by a widely popular article by Gregoire, is sure to resonate with any individual who feels the urge to create and will be informative for educators who seek to inspire habits of creativity in others. The stages of creativity have traditionally been defined as progressing from a period of knowledge gathering and preparation for insight, to an incubation period in which ideas form out of conscious awareness, to illumination in which there is a creative breakthrough, and finally to verification in which the idea is tested. Kaufman and Gregoire argue that this model describes the messy creative process too cleanly. The creative process requires disciplined switching between rational and imaginative thinking, each of which is supported by distinct networks in the brain. The creative person harbors paradoxes, prefers complexity, extracts order from disorders, takes risks, perseveres, and feels passion. Kaufman and Gregoire assert that a drive for exploration and an openness to new experiences may be the most essential force for enabling creative achievement. Dopamine, which the authors dub “the mother of human invention” is the neurotransmitter that urges us to explore. Creative people explore by enjoying artistic and imaginative hobbies outside of their domain of expertise and engaging in intellectual “cross-training”—learning ideas from across disciplines. Creativity is enhanced when we have novel experiences, whether those experiences are cross-cultural exchanges or simply driving home from work using an unusual route. Creative people do not think of work and play as divorced; they do not pit effort and inspiration against one another. Playful adults are less stressed and more successful. For children imaginative play enhances creativity, but youth today have too little time for free, uninstructed play. Like play, experiencing passion is important. Passionate children are more likely to grow into creative adults, especially if they pursued a “harmonious passion” out of a deep curiosity and love of the activity. Inevitably, creative pursuits will present hurdles, but possessing an image of oneself as someone who will overcome any obstacle to achieve her creative dream can help one realize that dream. Day dreaming is typically characterized as a costly distraction from important learning and instruction. Kaufman and Gregoire argue that in its positive constructive form day dreaming is valuable for planning one’s future, engaging in self-reflection, and even feeling compassion for others. They praise the uninterrupted sick-in-bed day, the long hot shower, or the leisurely walk in nature, all of which are known to have spurred creative insights. The advantage these activities confer may be in part because they are solitary. As many artists know, alone time is critical for developing emotional maturity and a sense of oneself. Indeed, it is when we are alone that the brain network that enables creativity is most likely to be active. Aloneness can help us hear more clearly our inner intuitions and gut feelings, which are valuable guides. In the vein of the contradictory creative process, as valuable as day dreaming is, the opposite, mindfulness, facilitates creativity also. When we are mindful, we experience more of life by focusing on what we observe. Indeed mindfulness has been shown to increase activation in the brain network that supports imagination. Just a few minutes of meditation before a test can boost performance. One step we can take towards increasing mindfulness is to put our smartphones down and spend less time “grazing” on social media. Creative people are typically more sensitive. They respond strongly to emotional, cognitive, and physical stimuli. Sensitivity allows the creative person to make herself vulnerable, which can help produce creative achievements. Sensitive individuals who are reared in harsh conditions, may experience that upbringing as even harsher than less sensitive others would. The suffering artist is a common trope; it is true that people who have experienced adversity are inclined to express themselves creatively as this can be a way of coping with and making meaning of that adversity. Being a creative person in our society takes tremendous courage and perseverance. It means breaking from the crowd, contradicting norms, and taking risks. Often the external reward for doing so, if it ever comes, is delayed. Nonetheless, as Kaufman and Gregoire show, we all benefit when we laud creativity in all its messy, contradictory beauty. About the Author Scott Barry Kaufman, Ph.D., is scientific director of the Imagination Institute and investigates the measurement and development of imagination, creativity and well-being in the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania. He has written or edited six previous books, including Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined. He is also co-founder of The Creativity Post, host of The Psychology Podcast, and he writes the blog Beautiful Minds for Scientific American. Kaufman lives in Philadelphia. Carolyn Gregoire is a senior writer at the Huffington Post, where she reports on psychology, mental health, and neuroscience. She has spoken at TEDx and the Harvard Public Health Forum, and has appeared on MSNBC, the Today show, the History Channel and HuffPost Live. Gregoire lives in New York City.

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