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    # Highly Recommended《Bran-New + Hardcover Edition + Achieving Success Through Mastering Self-Control & Willpower》Walter Mischel - THE MARSHMALLOW TEST : Mastering Self-Control

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    2 months ago oleh trustedplatform

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    This New York Times and international acclaimed bestseller in hardcover edition is a bran-new book and still wrapped with new-book plastic wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM121.08 (Hardcover). Now here Only at RM36. "This is an amazing - eye-opening, transformative, riveting - book from one of the greatest psychologists of our time. Mischel delivers the powerful message that self-control can be enhanced, and shows us how!"― Carol S. Dweck, Professor of Psychology, Stanford University, author of Mindset Renowned psychologist Walter Mischel, designer of the famous Marshmallow Test, explains what self-control is and how to master it. The Marshmallow Test was created by Dr. Mischel over 40 years ago at Stanford University. A child is presented with a marshmallow and given a choice: Eat this one now, or wait and enjoy two later. What will she do? And what are the implications for her behavior later in life? Dr. Mischel's research used preschoolers in order to understand the relationship between delaying instant gratification and the cognitive processes used to achieve self-control. Only 30% of the preschoolers were able to delay gratification in order to receive a reward of two marshmallows. Subsequently, Dr. Mischel then followed these preschoolers later in life and discovered that being able to delay gratification resulted in higher test scores, better coping skills, and higher levels of achievement. The world's leading expert on self-control, Walter Mischel has proven that the ability to delay gratification is critical for a successful life, predicting higher SAT scores, better social and cognitive functioning, a healthier lifestyle and a greater sense of self-worth. These curious correlations are at the heart of The Marshmallow Test, which surveys dozens of studies that document the power of self-control. Along the way, Mischel reveals the techniques that separate highly disciplined kids from their peers, tricks that anyone can use to sidestep the snares of temptation. But is willpower prewired, or can it be taught? In The Marshmallow Test, Mischel explains how self-control can be mastered and applied to challenges in everyday life—from weight control to quitting smoking, overcoming heartbreak, making major decisions, and planning for retirement. With profound implications for the choices we make in parenting, education, public policy and self-care, The Marshmallow Test will change the way you think about who we are and what we can be. The choice between instant or delayed rewards pits two factions within the brain against each other. One side, the “hot” limbic system, which includes the emotionally reactive amygdala, focuses on the mouthwatering marshmallow and urges us to enjoy it now. The other side, the “cool” prefrontal cortex, which oversees planning and problem solving, reasons that greater pleasure is worth the wait. Each child will respond differently to this mental tug-of-war, and factors such as genetics, parenting and environment can shape the reaction. For example, kids raised in unstable homes with unreliable adults are more apt to take their rewards right away. Experience has taught them to distrust the promise of future treats. Stress can also tip the balance toward hot thinking, which can explain why otherwise even-tempered adults will still succumb to inappropriate enticements when under duress. Fortunately, anyone can learn to delay gratification. Mischel's observations have revealed that people can study their lapses in self-control and develop personal coping strategies. Distraction, for example, can shift focus away from the siren call of a sweet snack or the lure of a cigarette. Cognitive reappraisal—in which we reinterpret our emotional response to something—can help us think of our greatest temptation as a toxin rather than a treat. And imagining how our future self would assess our decisions can keep shortsighted desires in check. This book is a very significant contribution to our understanding of the importance of self-control and how to better develop these skills. Since we live in an a society that is very oriented toward instant gratification, the timing of the release of The Marshmallow Test couldn't have come at a better time. The Marshmallow Test is a wonderfully rich treat in itself, laden with advice and detailed research. Mischel presents all his conclusions with nuance, reminding readers of the wide variation in human behavior. He also acknowledges that the occasional lapse in self-control could be good. A life spent working and waiting can be just as deleterious as one spent giving in to every reward or vice. Still, in most cases, the science of self-control is clear: good things really do come to those who wait. This book holds a wonderfully invigorating message: new research has proven that we are not prisoners to nature, nor to nurture. If we want to, we can change those most stubborn attributes of willpower and fear. Our life situation may not have set us up to be college graduates, financially stable, healthy, or heroes, but we still can be. We decide. We are capable. The Marshmallow Test does not give you a thirty day plan to achieving your dreams. It does not provide recipes or an exercise regimen. It gives you the tools to create positive change, and it is up to you to use them. In short, this book adds a new weapon to your arsenal for the battle against temptations. Do you want to know how to readily resist the temptation for the cheesecake in front of you? Do you want to know how to suppress the temptation for lighting your next cigarette? How about saving your marriage and not indulging in an infidelity? Well, you're gonna be equipped with the knowledge, and techniques to win the war of resistance in this book.. Now let's look at some of the weapons you can use in the war of temptation: 1. Cool VS Hot: Whenever facing a tempting situation, like a piece of cake you want to avoid, there are two aspects to the situation, Hot and cold. The desirable attributes of the cake, its sweetness, taste, smell, look constitute the hot dimension and thinking in this hot manner, makes you crave more and more till you indulge. On the other hand, you could imagine the cake in a cool manner, for instance, you can imagine it being a picture, or even you can turn the delicious, yummy cake into a disgusting object by visualizing it, for example, to be filled with cockroaches. In essence: The power is not in the stimulus, however, but in how it is mentally appraised: if you change how you think about it, its impact on what you feel and do changes, The tempting chocolate mousse on the restaurant dessert tray loses its allure if you imagine a cockroach just snacked on it in the kitchen 2. Disassociate yourself: Whenever facing a hard situation (resisting a temptation or suffering a break up) imagin watching yourself from the eyes of another person. This way you shif the gears of your thoughts to a higher, cooler and more logical cognitive thinking. 3. Three stages of self-control: In all the self-control tactics, there exist three stages: First, you have to remember and actively keep in mind your chosen goal (if you eat the cake, you won't get fit). Second, you have to monitor your progress toward your goal and make the necessary corrections by shifting your attention and cognitions flexibly between goal-oriented thoughts and temptation=reducing techniques. Third, you have to inhibit impulsive responses like thinking about how appealing the temptations were or reaching out to touch them, that woyld prevent you from attaining your goal. 4. It all comes down to expectation: Till now, it was believed that for instance performing mentally-demanding tasks would lead to decision fatigue (running out of willpower). But now, it's discovered that it all comes down to your expectation, if you expect to get tired after a workout, you'll be tired, and if you expect to get energized after solving a math puzzle, you will be... 5. Your future self If you vividly imaging your future self with your desired goal (being fit, not smoking etc.) and emotionally get engaged with this future picture of yours, you will far more likely to stay commited to your resolutions. Many more... About the Author Walter Mischel holds the Robert Johnston Niven chair as professor of humane letters in psychology at Columbia University. He is the author of more than two hundred scientific papers as well as the coauthor of Introduction to Personality, now in its eighth edition. He has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has won the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of APA and the Grawemeyer Award for Psychology. He lives in New York.

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