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# Highly Recommended《Bran-New + Hardcover Edition + Insights Of How China Companies Become Game Changer To The World Now And Future》China's Disruptors : How Alibaba(阿里), Xiaomi(小米), Tencent(腾讯), and Other Companies Are Changing the Rules of Business

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This International bestseller in hardcover edition is a bran-new book and nicely wrapped with protective book-wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM116.19 (Hardcover). Now here Only at RM32. In China's Disruptors, Edward Tse takes an unprecedented inside look at rapidly emerging Chinese entrepreneurs and their game-changing impact on both China and the world. In September 2014, Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba raised $25 billion in the world s biggest-ever initial public offering. Since then, millions of investors and managers worldwide have pondered a fundamental question: What s "really "going on with the new wave of China s disruptors? Alibaba wasn't an outlier it s one of a rising tide of thriving Chinese companies, mostly but not exclusively in the technology sector. Overnight, its founder, Jack Ma, appeared on the same magazine covers as American entrepreneurial icons like Mark Zuckerberg. Ma was quickly followed by the founders of other previously little-known companies, such as Baidu(百度), Tencent(腾讯), and Xiaomi(小米). Over the past two decades, an unprecedented burst of entrepreneurialism has transformed China s economy from a closed, impoverished, state-run system into a major power in global business. As products in China become more and more sophisticated, and as its companies embrace domestically developed technology, we will increasingly see Chinese goods setting global standards. Meanwhile, companies in the rest of the world wonder how they can access the fast-rising incomes of China s 1.3 billion consumers. Now Edward Tse, a leading global strategy consultant, reveals how China got to this point, and what the country s rise means for the United States and the rest of the world. Tse has spent more than twenty years working with senior Chinese executives, learning firsthand how China s most powerful companies operate. He s an expert on how private firms are thriving in what is still, officially, a communist country. His book draws on exclusive interviews and case studies to explore questions such as ● What drives China s entrepreneurs? Personal fame and fortune or a quest for national pride and communal achievement? ● How do these companies grow so quickly? In 2005, Lenovo sold just one category of products (personal computers) in one market, China. Today, not only is it the world s largest PC seller; it is also the world s third-largest smartphone seller. ● How does Chinese culture shape the strategies and tactics of these business leaders? Can outsiders copy what the Chinese are doing? ● Can capitalists really thrive within a communist system? How does Tencent s Pony Ma serve as a member of China s parliament while running a company that dominates online games and messaging? ● What impact will China have on the rest of the world as its private companies enter new markets, acquire foreign businesses, and threaten established firms in countless industries? As Tse concludes: I believe that as a consequence of the opening driven by China s entrepreneurs, the push to invest in science, research, and development, and the new freedoms that people are enjoying across the country, China has embarked on a renaissance that could rival its greatest era in history the Tang dynasty. These entrepreneurs are the front line in China s intense hunger for success. They will have an even more remarkable impact on the global economy in the future, through the rest of this decade and beyond. " Excellent introduction to some of the key private sector players driving China's continued economic growth and modernization. Challenges the existing Western narrative of China as an innovation desert filled with copycat firms exploiting weak intellectual property laws to steal unfair advantages from foreign competitors. While there is some truth to that characterization, Edward Tse tells the story of a different China, one filled with highly innovative and creative private sector companies battling each other for some small advantage in the intensely competitive Chinese domestic market. Through profiles of some of China's most successful private companies, Tse persuasively argues that these companies will play an increasingly important role in shaping the future China's state and society, as well as the entire global economy. We have to give the author credit for trying to tackle a complex subject for the world of business and entrepreneurship in China is not an easy one to navigate, neither for the people directly involved in it nor long-time observers such as Edward Tse. The author has spent a lot of time in the Greater China Region understanding the trends and changes in business in China against a backdrop of a Communist-controlled government and the still-dominant position of state-owned enterprises. This should be required reading for anyone trying to understand the driving force behind China's behavior on the global stage in the 21st century. The debouche of the private sector with the arrival of successful companies such as Alibaba and Huawei after the tight lid of the centrally planned economy was taken off, however, is sure to continue and happen on a grander and more global scale. China is changing rapidly as we speak, and reading about some of the figures around China's merger and acquisitions in the U.S. was eye-opening. There will be no shortages of hyperboles around paradigm shifts in the global economy as a result of the changes, innovations and advances propagated by Chinese companies, whether or not as a result of collaboration with foreign partners. The next wave of entrepreneurs is being formed right underneath our noses. They are global, sophisticated, and savvy. They are in US universities, high schools and elementary schools in record numbers today and they are also graduating in greater numbers from some of the most prestigious universities in China. The coming total graduate workforce from China will reach 200 million by the year 2020, larger than the US workforce, according to the author. That is significant. As China continues to let its citizens prosper, more attention can be paid to the education of its people, and what then will follow is a continual wave of entrepreneurship, business transactions, R&D, innovation, and collaboration with other companies or countries. The author makes several astute observations. One of them is that Chinese companies and entrepreneurs that experience obstacles in their home country would make them and their prodigy better equipped to deal with ambiguity, risk, and complexity when expanding overseas. Another astute comment the author made is that "China's official spending has been aimed at matching Western capabilities and achievements, not at pushing forward into new areas. The rationale is straightforward: unless Chinese scientists and engineers can do the same things as their Western counterparts, they will not be able to move beyond their achievements....the suggestions that China's corporate innovation amounts to nothing beyond playing catch-up is to miss the across-the-board scale of what is happening...." (page 107). It is easy to misread what is happening 'across the board' in terms of the business landscape in China. It is like trying to read words on a fast-moving train. But in the midst of trying to analyze what is taking place in the private sector in China and what its future holds, it is a mistake to continue to hold the view that China cannot innovate. One key theme that many readers did pick up is that what is relevant going forward for China is how Chinese companies successfully grow, innovate, push and sustain their business models on a more international scale while remaining successful at home going forward. China is no longer copycat nation, at least not for much longer; it is on a brand new trajectory, and the government, the private sector, and its people will remain key to shaping the country's business future. ----------------------------------------------------- Review Of Financial Times : ‘China’s Disruptors’ by Edward Tse: For many outsiders, China’s economy is centrally planned and dominated by a crushingly powerful state. What little room there is for private enterprise is tightly regulated by an authoritarian and capricious government. China’s private companies leech off western technology and possess few ideas of their own. Edward Tse, an author who has spent years advising Chinese companies, says this view is wrong. “Suggestions that China’s corporate innovation amounts to nothing beyond playing catch-up is to miss the across-the-board scale of what is happening,” he writes in China’s Disruptors. For him, China is becoming an evermore entrepreneurial economy, in which four generations of visionaries have pushed radical change and created genuinely innovative businesses. There is expanding room for the private sector to challenge state banks, telecoms companies and even hospitals. Rather than a top-down, planned economy, he describes one in constant churn, where companies such as Xiaomi, pioneer of the $50 smartphone, offer a dizzying cycle of products to keep the loyalty of a newly empowered consumer class. Tse’s business pioneers — those such as Alibaba’s Jack Ma, Haier’s Zhang Ruimin, and Baidu’s Robin Li — have ambition, entrepreneurial flair and a desire to make China great again. The author would even cast his entrepreneurs as agents of social change: not leaders of the democratic revolution that westerners obsess over, but influential actors who will nudge the state towards better environmental practices, better healthcare and the rule of law. Tse’s book is too rosy. In these pages, entrepreneurs are pushing boundaries, never bribing officials or pinching other companies’ blueprints. He hardly alludes to the close ties that China’s entrepreneurs must cultivate with the ruling Communist party, nor to tainted milk, crashing high-speed trains or dodgy wealth management products. Still, the book is a useful corrective for those who regard China as a calcified state-driven economy and underestimate the changes taking place. According to Tse, China’s private entrepreneurs account for two-thirds of national output and nearly nine out of 10 jobs. He sees them operating in an environment he gives the acronym Soot, which stands for scale, openness, official support and technology. China’s extraordinary size has certainly allowed companies to gain critical mass. Tse sees China’s commercial environment as more open than usually recognised, with swaths of the economy left virtually alone. For him, the internet, often regarded as the epitome of the state’s controlling hand, is actually a liberating, disruptive force that has jolted a market of 1.3bn into the 21st century. The author predicts that, as a result of this dynamic business environment — and contrary to western predictions of Communist party collapse — we will see “the emergence not just of a richer and more powerful China, but also a more confident, relaxed China”. Because of the forces of creative destruction that have been unleashed, he says, successful Chinese companies will soon be able to take on the world. About the Author EDWARD TSE is the founder and CEO of Gao Feng Advisory Company, a global strategy consulting firm with roots in China. As well as helping hundreds of companies—both inside and outside China—develop and apply their strategies, he has also worked with the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and the Chinese government on issues related to China’s economic reform policies. The author of The China Strategy, he has contributed essays and articles to Harvard Business Review, strategy + business, South China Morning Post, and China Daily. He lives in Hong Kong and Shanghai. 作者简介 谢祖墀博士是高风咨询公司(Gao Feng Advisory Company) 创始人、董事长。他已有近30年从事管理咨询和公司高层管理的经验, 在过去20年曾经先后领导波士顿咨询公司(The Boston Consulting Group)和博斯咨询公司(Booz & Company)在大中华区的业务。外界评价他为“中国的全球领先商业战略家”。 他著有: 《方向》、《中国战略》以及《跨越》等三本书,同时在《哈佛商业评论》,《战略+经营》杂志、香港《南华早报》、《中国日报》等报刊上发表过多篇文章。目前居于香港和上海。

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