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    . # Highly Recommended《Bran-New + Hardcover + The Future Of Business Does Not Lie In Hits But In Niches》Chris Anderson –THE LONG TAIL : Why the Future of Business is Selling Less of More

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    This All-Time Internationally Acclaimed New York Times Bestseller in hardcover edition is a bran-new book and nicely wrapped protective book wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM96.67 (Hardcover). Now hardcover here Only at RM25.   Highly recommended and a-must-read book for those who want to survive or excel in Online Platform business marketing environment .. It is the fundamental book for online start-up. “The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business Is Selling Less of More” is a book by Chris Anderson, Editor in chief of Wired magazine.The book was initially published on July 11, 2006. The book, Anderson's first, is an expansion of his 2004 article The Long Tail in the magazine. ★★ The book was listed in The New York Times Nonfiction Best Sellers list★★ ★★ Winner of the Gerald Loeb Award for Best Business Book of the Year ★★ ★★ It was shortlisted for the Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award on 18 September 2006★★ The book argues that products in low demand or that have a low sales volume can collectively build a better market share than their rivals, or exceed the relatively few current bestsellers and blockbusters, provided the store or distribution channel is large enough. The term long tail has gained popularity as describing the retailing strategy of selling a large number of different items which each sell in relatively small quantities, usually in addition to selling large quantities of a small number of popular items. Chris Anderson popularized the concept in an October 2004 Wired magazine article, in which he mentioned Amazon.com, Apple and Yahoo! as examples of businesses applying this strategy. In The Long Tail, Chris Anderson offers a visionary look at the future of business and common culture. The long-tail phenomenon, he argues, will "re-shape our understanding of what people actually want to watch" (or read, etc.). What happens ☞ when there is almost unlimited choice? ☞ When everything is available to everyone? ☞ When the combined value of the millions of items that only sell in small quantities equals or even exceeds the value of a handful of best-sellers?   This book shows that the current and future of business does not lie in hits, but in what used to be regarded as misses.   In this ground-breaking book, Chris Anderson shows that the future of business does not lie in hits - the high-volume end of a traditional demand curve - but in what used to be regarded as misses - the endlessly long tail of that same curve.   As our world is transformed by the Internet and the near infinite choice it offers consumers, so traditional business models are being overturned and new truths revealed about what consumers want and how they want to get it. Chris Anderson first explored the Long Tail in an article in Wired magazine that has become one of the most influential business essays of our time. Now, in this eagerly anticipated book, he takes a closer look at the new economics of the Internet age, showing where business is going and exploring the huge opportunities that exist: for new producers, new e-tailers, and new tastemakers.   He demonstrates how long tail economics apply to industries ranging from the toy business to advertising to kitchen appliances. He sets down the rules for operating in a long tail economy. And he provides a glimpse of a future that's already here.   Therefore, “The Long Tail”, in a nutshell: The theory of the Long Tail is that our culture and economy is increasingly shifting away from a focus on a relatively small number of "hits" (mainstream products and markets) at the head of the demand curve and toward a huge number of niches in the tail. As the costs of production and distribution fall, especially online, there is now less need to lump products and consumers into one-size-fits-all containers. In an era without the constraints of physical shelf space and other bottlenecks of distribution, narrowly-targeted goods and services can be as economically attractive as mainstream fare.   One example of this is the theory's prediction that demand for products not available in traditional bricks and mortar stores is potentially as big as for those that are. But the same is true for video not available on broadcast TV on any given day, and songs not played on radio. In other words, the potential aggregate size of the many small markets in goods that don't individually sell well enough for traditional retail and broadcast distribution may someday rival that of the existing large market in goods that do cross that economic bar.   Traditional retail economics dictate that stores only stock the likely hits, because shelf space is expensive. But online retailers (from Amazon to iTunes) can stock virtually everything, and the number of available niche products outnumber the hits by several orders of magnitude. Those millions of niches are the Long Tail, which had been largely neglected until recently in favor of the Short Head of hits.   When consumers are offered infinite choice, the true shape of demand is revealed. And it turns out to be less hit-centric than we thought. People gravitate towards niches because they satisfy narrow interests better, and in one aspect of our life or another we all have some narrow interest (whether we think of it that way or not).   As the costs of production and distribution fall, especially online, there is now less need to lump products and consumers into one-size-fits-all containers. In an era without the constraints of physical shelf space and other bottlenecks of distribution, narrowly-targeted goods and services can be as economically attractive as mainstream fare.   One example of this is the theory's prediction that demand for products not available in traditional bricks and mortar stores is potentially as big as for those that are. But the same is true for video not available on broadcast TV on any given day, and songs not played on radio. In other words, the potential aggregate size of the many small markets in goods that don't individually sell well enough for traditional retail and broadcast distribution may someday rival that of the existing large market in goods that do cross that economic bar.   Traditional retail economics dictate that stores only stock the likely hits, because shelf space is expensive. But online retailers (from Amazon to iTunes) can stock virtually everything, and the number of available niche products outnumber the hits by several orders of magnitude. Those millions of niches are the Long Tail, which had been largely neglected until recently in favor of the Short Head of hits.   When consumers are offered infinite choice, the true shape of demand is revealed. And it turns out to be less hit-centric than we thought. People gravitate towards niches because they satisfy narrow interests better, and in one aspect of our life or another we all have some narrow interest (whether we think of it that way or not). Our research project has attempted to quantify the Long Tail in three ways, comparing data from online and offline retailers in music, movies, and books. ① What's the size of the Long Tail (defined as inventory typically not available offline)? ② How does the availability of so many niche products change the shape of demand? Does it shift it away from hits? ③ What tools and techniques drive that shift, and which are most effective?   The Long Tail book is about the big-picture consequence of this: how our economy and culture is shifting from mass markets to million of niches. It chronicles the effect of the technologies that have made it easier for consumers to find and buy niche products, thanks to the "infinite shelf-space effect"--the new distribution mechanisms, from digital downloading to peer-to-peer markets, that break through the bottlenecks of broadcast and traditional bricks and mortar retail.   The Wikipedia entry on the Long Tail does an excellent job of expanding on this.   The shift from hits to niches is a rich seam, manifest in all sorts of surprising places. This blog is where I'm going to collect everything I can about it. Personally, l am highly recommending readers to read the following link of Review From Wired.Com: https://www.wired.com/2004/10/tail/ ---------------------------------------------- Review From Guardian The Long Tail takes its title from those millions of niche buyers (who show up on sales graphs as a 'tail') whose spending patterns do not contribute to the 'short head' of bestsellerism, but who still play a vital role in the cultural economy of the West. 'Niche' promotion has long been a commonplace of the cultural market, but when Anderson, the Californian editor of Wired magazine, came up with a new phrase to describe the buying and selling of books and records that were not necessarily bestsellers, he not only gave new life to an old concept, but also some useful theoretical underpinning to a market being transformed by online selling. The ongoing war between Microsoft and Google only makes his survey even more topical. Anderson's analysis of the mass market is timely in another way, too. Since the millennium, film, book, television programme and music distributors have been forced to recognise that the era of the blockbuster is over. Across the board, sales of bestsellers have slumped by as much as 25 per cent, threatening the basic economics of traditional book and music stores. Top of the Pops is just a symbolic casualty of this trend. Moreover, Anderson was the first to recognise the importance of the infinite shelf space afforded by the online revolution. Subtitled 'how endless choice is creating unlimited demand', this is an essentially optimistic account of mass culture, in which the glass of consumerism is half full. Not since the launch of Malcolm Gladwell's The Tipping Point has a book, now a buzz phrase, captured the imagination of so many cultural entrepreneurs worldwide. Especially among those for whom dumbed-down bookshops, for example, represent the gateway to a fresh hell of lowest-common-denominator literary consumption, Anderson is now seen as a voice of reason and the long-awaited champion of minority taste. Less engaging than Gladwell, and aimed at a business book market, with a weave of economics, technology and pop-culture psychology, Anderson's lively contribution is the kind of book with which to pass a transatlantic flight and will probably be breaking the ice at sales conferences for years to come. About the Author Chris Anderson is Editor-in-Chief of Wired magazine, a position he's held since 2001. In 2002 and 2004, he led the magazine to a 2002 National Magazine Awards nomination for General Excellence. He has worked at The Economist, where he served as U.S. Business Editor. His career began at the two premier science journals, Science and Nature, where he served in several editorial capacities. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from George Washington University and studied Quantum Mechanics and Science Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley.

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