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# Highly Recommended《Bran-New + Inspirational Stories Of People Around The World that Emabarked On Self-Discovery Route & Own-Calling Searching》Po Bronson - WHAT SHOULD I DO WITH MY LIFE ? : The True Story of People Who Answered the Ultimate Question

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3 months ago oleh trustedplatform

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RM24

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16 Suka

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★★ #1 New York Times Bestseller ★★ ★★ #1 Wall Street Journal Bestseller ★★ ★★ #1 Businessweek Bestseller ★★ ★★ #1 Los Angeles Times Bestseller ★★ ★★ #1 Boston Globe Bestseller ★★ ★★ #1 San Francisco Chronicle Bestseller ★★ ★★ Good Morning America Book Club Selection ★★ This #1 International bestseller in paperback edition is a bran-new book and nicely wrapped with protective book-wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM75.60. Now here Only at RM24. Po Bronson tackles the biggest, most threatening, most obvious question that anyone has to face, 'what should I do with my life?' It is a problem that is increasingly encountered not just by the young but by people who have half their lives or more behind them. The modern route to self-discovery is to trade what you have for a completely different way of life, to face the challenges and finally confront our real aims and desires. Bronson's book is a fascinating account of finding and following people who have uprooted their lives and fought with these questions in radical ways. From the investment banker who gave it all up to become a catfish farmer in Mississippi, to the chemical engineer from Walthamstow who decided to become a lawyer in his sixties; these stories of individual dilemma and dramatic - and sometimes unsuccessful - gambles are bound up with Bronson's account of his own search for a calling. In What Should I Do with My Life? Po Bronson tells the inspirational true stories of people who have found the most meaningful answers to that great question. With humor, empathy, and insight, Bronson writes of remarkable individuals—from young to old, from those just starting out to those in a second career—who have overcome fear and confusion to find a larger truth about their lives and, in doing so, have been transformed by the experience. What Should I Do with My Life? struck a powerful, resonant chord on publication, causing a multitude of people to rethink their vocations and priorities and start on the path to finding their true place in the world. For this edition, Bronson has added nine new profiles, to further reflect the range and diversity of those who broke away from the chorus to learn the sound of their own voice. Adult/High School-Some of the individuals Bronson interviewed have not found the answer to the title question, some aren't sure there is one for them, while others think their answer may be only temporary. The 55 pieces range from a woman who had wanted to be a doctor since age six but changed her mind abruptly after realizing her dream, to a Native American who wrote a 20-year plan for his future that would enable him to devise and implement ways for his people to wean themselves from government handouts. Bronson has both bad and good jobs behind him, and his interviews include his own insightful reactions to and thoughts about his subjects' ideas and personalities. The discussions of mistakes, lessons, and hard-fought decisions on the iffy road to occupational fulfillment will be valuable for teens. ------------------------------------------------- Review From The Guardian: What should I do with my life? It's the question, inevitably, that arises only when you have answered the basics, such as "Do I have a roof over my head?" and "Can I get enough to eat?" It occurs most insistently to the relatively wealthy, and to a generation that has largely abandoned the crutches of organised religion and cannot achieve lasting comfort from nibbling at the smorgasbord of new-age spiritualisms, that seeks meaning above all in work. It is perhaps the defining question of Generation X. Po Bronson, author of two bestselling novels of late capitalism and a non-fiction account of life in Silicon Valley, wants to know how people answer it. He has gone out and interviewed many people - mostly in their late 20s and 30s, with a few middle-aged folks thrown in - who suffered career crises. In the process he has produced a fascinating social document, and a kind of superior self-help book. The inspirational success stories usually involve high-fliers who downshift to find happiness: the woman in tech PR who becomes a landscape gardener; the English diplomat who spends six months in hospital and becomes a teacher at a Walthamstow comprehensive; the corporate lawyer who becomes a long-haul trucker. On the other hand, there are people who try something only to realise it doesn't fit their dream. A Hollywood production executive goes to medical school and finally becomes a doctor, only to realise that she hates being surrounded by sick people; a successful screenwriter moves away from LA to pursue his dream of writing novels, but then agrees to ghostwrite a friend's biography instead. Clearly many of the subjects are inspired by these meetings - Bronson helps one guy to realise what he is really passionate about is inventing golf equipment, and within a few months he has a foot in the door of the industry. Bronson's prose is very readable, full of rhetorical chattiness, entertaining recastings of familiar ideas ("hypergalactic theism - attributing too much karmic intelligence to the universe"), and snappy pop-anthropological coinages such as "boom wrangler" (the type of person who is always at the cutting edge of the coolest new industry) or "change junkie". But he does not always resist the temptation to discuss his interviewees in the terms of dimestore psychoanalysis. What makes the book as a whole very American is a kind of can-do hokiness, and a weird brand of economic panglossianism. "Our economy is so vast that we don't have to grind it out forever at jobs we hate," he burbles; he should meet Barbara Ehrenreich, whose Nickel and Dimed is an account of living on the breadline for two years in the US. The very choices he assumes are available to all actually depend on a proportion of workers who do have to grind it out at jobs they hate - unless Bronson seriously believes there are some people who are blissfully happy cleaning toilets and scrubbing floors. Bronson is also highly impatient of talented people who refuse to play the game of modern capitalism to the best of their abilities. He talks of a group he nicknames the "brilliant masses", "far too many of whom are operating at quarter-speed, unsure of their place in the world, contributing far too little to the productive engine of modern civilisation". He never apparently questions whether being a well-greased cog in this "productive engine" is something to which we should all uncritically aspire. It is notable that we meet no one in his book who decides to become a Buddhist monk. One of Bronson's more provo-cative insights is that "the conclusion that brain candy is not enough is probably the most threatening to our generation's belief system". But what he thinks is required beyond brain candy remains vague, couched only in a language of greetings-card sentiment that attains an unhappy climax by the book's end. We discern a powerful odour of warballs in the declaration that "I didn't know that my desire for this book would survive . . . the catastrophe of September 11", and may be mystified by the revelation that what Bronson has learned on his own journey of self-discovery is that "I'd rather have a heart than a mind". To which the only possible answer is that if you don't have both, you're dead. Amazon.com Review : In What Should I Do with My Life? Po Bronson manages to create a career book that is a page-turner. His 50 vivid profiles of people searching for "their soft spot--their true calling" will engage readers because Bronson is asking himself the same question. He explores his premise, that "nothing is braver than people facing up to their own identity," as an anthropologist and autobiographer. He tackles thorny, nuanced issues about self-determination. Among them: paradoxes of money and meaning, authorship and destiny, brain candy and novelty versus soul food. Bronson’s stories, limited to professional people and complete with photos, are gems. They include a Los Angeles lawyer who became a priest, a Harvard MBA catfish farmer turned biotech executive, and a Silicon Valley real estate agent who opened a leather crafts factory in Costa Rica. Bronson is a gifted intuitive writer, the bestselling author of The Nudist on the Late Shift, whose thoughtful, vulnerable voice emerges as the book’s greatest strength and challenge. He describes his subject’s lives along with the ways they annoy, puzzle, and worry him. He frets about meddling with his questions, yet once, memorably and appropriately, he offers a talented man a top post in his publishing company. While this creates the juiciness of his portraits, it also can make Bronson the book’s most memorable character and the only one whose story is not resolved. Even so, this remarkable career chronicle sets the gold standard for the worth of the examined life. -------------------------------------------------- About the Author Po Bronson is the author of Bombardiers, The First $20 Million Is Always the Hardest, and The Nudist on the Late Shift. He is on the board of directors of Consortium Book Sales & Distribution and the editorial board of Zoetrope: All Story magazine, and has written for The New York Times Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, and Wired. He graduated from Stanford with a B.A. in economics and from San Francisco State with an M.F.A. in creative writing. He lives in San Francisco.

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