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# Highly Recommended《Bran-New + The Mind-Opening Wisdom And Secrets To Succeed In Doing Business In China & Anywhere》Tim Clisssold - CHINESE RULES : Five Timeless Lessons for Succeeding in China

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6 months ago oleh trustedplatform

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RM25

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This Financial Times & New York Times bestseller in paperback edition is a bran-new book and nicely wrapped with protective book-wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM58.74. Now here Only at RM25. To understand China...Everyone must understand THEIR HISTORY.... From the author of the international bestseller Mr. China comes another rollicking ride through the slick mega-cities and industrial backwaters of twenty-first-century China—part adventure story, part erudite myth-buster, and part practical rule book to help Westerners win in China. China's role as struggling underdog is now firmly a thing of the past. The world has tilted eastward in its orbit even as the West seems mired in self-doubt. Through living and working in China for more than two decades, Tim Clissold has uncovered stealth methods Westerners can use to straighten out complicated situations in China and achieve their own objectives. Revealing the hidden logic that governs the Chinese business and political landscape, Clissold puts China's cultural, political, and military history into context and explains the mind-set that drives Chinese political and business leaders—a resource that has been sorely lacking in most books about doing business in China. Here, with sharp observations and a deep appreciation for China's rich past, Clissold presents five rules anyone can use to deal effectively with modern Chinese counterparts. These include understanding that: China has its own set of rules that provide a unique pathway to success; ● the quest for stability overrides all others; ● in China, one should never attack directly; ● in solving problems, stick to practicalities and avoid arguments over theory; ● and knowing yourself and knowing the "other" will help you survive a hundred battles. Combining exuberant storytelling, sly humor, and counterintuitive insights, Chinese Rules traces Clissold's latest adventures, providing an object lesson in the contradictions between reality and conventional belief that continue to make China a fascinating, perplexing, and irresistible destination for Westerners. In the twenty-first century, the world has tilted eastwards in its orbit; China grows confident while the West seems mired in doubt. Having lived and worked in China for more than two decades, Tim Clissold explains the secrets that Westerners can use to navigate through its cultural and political maze. Picking up where he left off in the international bestseller Mr. China, Chinese Rules chronicles his most recent exploits, with assorted Chinese bureaucrats, factory owners, and local characters building a climate change business in China. Of course, all does not go as planned as he finds himself caught between the world’s largest carbon emitter and the world’s richest man. Clissold offers entertaining and enlightening anecdotes of the absurdities, gaffes, and mysteries he encountered along the way. Sprinkled amid surreal scenes of cultural confusion and near misses, are smart myth-busting insights and practical lessons Westerns can use to succeed in China. Exploring key episodes in that nation’s long political, military, and cultural history, Clissold outlines five Chinese Rules, which anyone can deploy in on-the-ground situations with modern Chinese counterparts. These Chinese rules will enable foreigners not only to cooperate with China but also to compete with it on its own terms. Tim Clissold's book is part memoir, and part cultural study, and uses Chinese stratagem and historical examples to buttress his argument about the difficulty of doing business in China. In summary, the book is a memoir of a trip to China to negotiate carbon credits for a power plant within China's new, and hitherto, experimental, emissions trading scheme. However, with a business deal where much money hangs in the balance, much stubbornness and stonewalling is still found. Clissold's primary source of comparison is Sun Zi's Art of War, but many other proverbs and anecdotes are used. It also contains a number of interesting interludes into the lives of Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping, and the author draws surprising parallels for the present. A great book to understand differences between Chinese and Western cultural and business norms. Values can be relative and the Chinese approach to strategy and negotiations, although difficult to understand from Western lenses, has invaluable lessons that can be applied to a number of situations in business and in Life. --------------------------------------------- The Independent UK Review: A decade ago Tim Clissold’s Mr China added an invigorating dash of chilli to the rather bland soup of Western business writing on China. In this memoir, Clissold recounted working for a US private equity firm in China in the 1990s. As a Mandarin-speaker with some experience of the country, his job was to turn around the Chinese industrial firms that the American investment house had acquired. In practice, a great deal of Clissold’s time was spent trying to prevent the Americans seeing their entire portfolio sink down the Far Eastern plug hole. As well as being a hilarious and hair-raising read, Mr China provided an enlightening snapshot of the Chinese business sector in an era when it was opening up to foreign investment. Now, ten years on, Clissold has followed up its success with Chinese Rules. It’s essentially more of the same. This time Clissold is trying to make money by buying internationally tradable “carbon credits” from heavily polluting Chinese industrial firms. He runs a familiar gauntlet of obfuscation and skulduggery from local managers and shady intermediaries as he seeks to close deals. As in Mr China, Clissold shows that he’s an exceptional writer. The descriptive passages sparkle. And he has lost none of his storytelling verve. Clissold somehow manages to make the complex world of carbon trading read like a thriller. And his character sketch of the monumentally unscrupulous, yet crazily disorganised, Chinese corporate broker, Cordelia, is brilliant. There’s a good deal of practical wisdom here. As a buyer of carbon credits Clissold has to engage with the UN which, quite understandably, demands detailed documentation from Chinese firms on their financial plans before signing off on international deals that will inevitably deliver private profits. But, as Clissold notes, it’s often hard to produce such plans because in Chinese firms “decisions are often made for political rather than economic reasons”. How could it be any different when the state is so dominant in the Chinese economy, indirectly accounting for up to half of all economic activity, according to some? This state intrusion is manifested in other ways. The primary motivation of the managers of many Chinese firms, Clissold notes, isn’t to boost profits, as it is in the West, but to “avoid making mistakes and getting blamed later on”. He explains why a company’s formal stamp, or “chop”, is imbued with such importance in Chinese business. It’s because it “is critical to show it wasn’t just the idea of one leader who might lose power but a collective decision supported by the whole leadership”. He identifies four key rules for navigating the treacherous seas of Chinese commerce. First, recognise that it’s no use Western firms expecting things to work like they do at home. Second, understand that local firms will be susceptible to local political pressure. Rule number three is to find an oblique approach to solving a problem, rather than attacking it head on. Finally, he says, firms should adopt a pragmatic approach, learning from Deng Xiaoping’s dictum that when a cat catches mice it doesn’t matter what colour the feline is. It’s difficult to argue with Clissold’s experience. But the book falls down when Clissold starts talking about China more broadly. Here Chinese Rules, sadly, recycles a range of familiar and misleading clichés. Clissold says that the West needs to take China more seriously. He’s right about that. And he has made another stellar contribution to Western understanding of the country’s still chaotic business environment. The wider Chinese culture lessons he offers, though, are somewhat duller fare. About the Author Tim Clissold has lived and worked in China for more than twenty years and has traveled to most parts of the country. After graduating with degrees in physics and theoretical physics from Cambridge University, and working in London, Australia, and Hong Kong, he developed a fascination with China. He spent two years studying Mandarin in Beijing before cofounding a private equity group that invested more than $400 million there. He has since spent time at Goldman Sachs recovering distressed assets and, more recently, started a business that invests in projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions in China through the UN's Clean Development Mechanism. Mr. China was his first book. It has been translated into twelve languages and was an Economist magazine Book of the Year.

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