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# Highly Recommended《New Book Condition + Hardcover Edition + What Make Rebounders & How You Can Be One》Rick Newman - REBOUNDERS : How Winners Pivot from Setback to Success

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This New York Times bestseller in hardcover edition is a bran-new book and nicely wrapped with protective book-wrapper. The original new book is sold at usual price RM100.40. Now here Only at RM26 Let's face it: Setbacks happen, and failure is always a possibility. But here's the good news: Amazing success has been achieved by people who once fell flat on their faces. The secret lies in how we respond to life's bumps and pot holes and unwelcome detours—from getting fired or losing a business to enduring a professional rejection or pursuing a passion that fails to pan out. Misfortune, it turns out, can be a springboard to success. In Rebounders, U.S. News & World Report journalist Rick Newman examines the rise and fall—and rise again—of some of our most prolific and productive figures in order to demystify the anatomy of resilience. He identifies nine key traits found in people who bounce back that can transform a setback into the first step toward great accomplishment. Newman turns many well-worn axioms on their head as he shows how virtually anybody can improve their resilience and get better at turning adversity into personal and professional achievement. New Paradigm For Setbacks : ● Setbacks can be a secret weapon: They often teach vital things you'll never learn in school, on the job, or from others. ● There are smart ways to fail: Once familiar with them, you'll be more comfortable taking risks and less discouraged if they don't pan out. ● “Defensive pessimism” trumps optimism: Planning for what could go wrong is often the best way to ensure that it doesn't. ● Know when to quit: Walking away at the right time can free the resources you need to exploit better opportunities. ● “Own the suck”: When faced with true hardship, taking command of the pain and sorrow—rather than letting it command you—lays the groundwork for ultimately rising above it. Each lesson is highlighted by candid and inspiring stories from notable people, including musician Lucinda Williams, tennis champ James Blake, inventor Thomas Edison, army veteran and double-amputee Tammy Duckworth, and Joe Torre, former manager of the New York Yankees. In this uncertain and unstable time, Rebounders lays out the new rules for success and equips you with the tools you need to get ahead and thrive. In short, this book, Newman discusses the characteristics of the rebounder, a person who is able to take failure and turn it into success by learning from it. Newman uses over nine case studies to demonstrate how various people have rebounded from failures and mistakes to become successful in their fields, while highlighting the mental skills and tools that are necessary to accomplish this. You will find the stories to be inspiring and useful for helping you see how you could become a better rebounder. ------------------------------------------------ Amazon.com Review : Conversation with Author Rick Newman Q: Why is resilience important in today’s Darwinian economy? A: A lot of people are going to have a harder time getting ahead. It’s not necessarily their fault. Powerful forces such as globalization and the digital revolution are rapidly transforming the economy in ways we don’t completely understand yet. Here’s what we do know: Many of the old rules no longer apply, and there will be new classes of winners and losers. Better resilience allows people to recover faster from setbacks and stay confident while taking risks. It helps you become bold, without being reckless. It’s just the kind of edge people need today. Q: What is the science behind resilience? A: We develop resilience the way we develop athletic or academic skills: By practicing and getting better at it. Here’s the catch: Most people don’t want to fail, and parents in particular don’t want their kids to fail. So we’re programmed to avoid failure. To some extent, that’s a mistake. The good news, if you will, is that some sort of failure is inevitable for most people. So when it happens, it’s important to acknowledge it and learn from it. Researchers think of this in terms of building blocks: Learning how to recover from small setbacks, even as children, helps us build the reflexes and durability that will allow us to overcome bigger setbacks in the future. The vital thing is to recognize failure as a learning opportunity and not hide it, deny it or pretend it didn’t happen. Q: What are some examples of people who have turned setbacks into success? A: One of the things I discovered while writing this book is that many successful people have endured some kind of significant failure. These crucible moments often provide insights that open the door to success later on. Many of the titans we consider landmark Americans, such as Ben Franklin, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Edison and Henry Ford, experienced serious setbacks along the way. They became indomitable because they learned how to stumble and recover. It’s not just a historical phenomenon. In the book, I profile a dozen contemporary Americans whose failures helped make them successful. Tim Westergren was a burned-out musician when he got the idea for the Pandora Internet radio site, and realized it might be a way for struggling bands like the one he had been in to connect with new listeners they wouldn’t find any other way. As a player early in his baseball career, Joe Torre struggled with weak confidence and a raft of personal problems. But that later gave him a unique ability to manage the complex personalities on a team like the New York Yankees (not to mention the combative owner, George Steinbrenner), and turn them into world champions. Many of the people we envy and admire are far more familiar with failure than you’d ever guess. Q: What are some modern misconceptions of success? A: There’s a familiar slogan, “failure is not an option.” But that’s for amateurs; true achievers know that failure is often an option if you’re trying to do something difficult. Here’s another one: “Follow your bliss,” popularized by the mythologist Joseph Campbell and millions of baby boomers who sort of misunderstood what he was saying. Baby boomers made it trendy to seek passion in your career. Sounds great, but many people have followed their passion straight into a career dead-end because they didn’t think about what might go wrong. Passion alone usually isn’t enough. You often hear people talk about optimism as if simply looking on the sunny side will lead to riches. But optimism can be dangerous if it leads to a blind belief that things will work out with no need for extra effort. Resilient people believe they have the power to make their lives better, but they believe that because they’ve learned how to anticipate what could go wrong and developed “rebounding” skills they can summon when they need to. They’re not blind-sided by setbacks. Anticipating them helps surmount them. The best optimism comes from gaining experience at bouncing back. Q: Is an American renaissance possible? A: Many Americans feel a frustrating sense of decline, which I think is legitimate. I also think it’s reversible—but it’s going to take a newfound self-sufficiency to turn things around. New government policies won’t do it. Traditional safety nets will probably get weaker, not stronger. Anybody waiting for somebody else to solve his/her problems will be waiting a long time. But people who learn to channel the bootstrap ruggedness of the nation’s great achievers still face a very promising future. And self-sufficiency is a core virtue possessed by Rebounders. That’s why Rebounders will be the vanguard of the American renaissance. About the Author Rick Newman is chief business correspondent for U.S. News & World Report as well as a frequent commentator on MSNBC, CNN, Fox, NPR, and other TV and radio networks. He is the co-author of Firefight: Inside the Battle to Save the Pentagon on 9/11 and Bury Us Upside Down: The Misty Pilots and the Secret Battle for the Ho Chi Minh Trail. He lives outside New York City.

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