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    # Highly Recommended《Preloved Hardcover + Making Life More Effective By Do Less Get More Done》Leo Babauta - THE POWER OF LESS : The Fine Art of Limiting Yourself to the Essential...in Business and in Life

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    This New York Times bestseller in hardcover edition is a preloved book and wrapped with protective book-wrapper. Noted that the book has the appearance of yellowing and stiill in good condition. The Original New Book is sold at RM94.72. With the countless distractions that come from every corner of a modern life, it's amazing that were ever able to accomplish anything. The Power of Less demonstrates how to streamline your life by identifying the essential and eliminating the unnecessary freeing you from everyday clutter and allowing you to focus on accomplishing the goals that can change your life for the better. The Power of Less will show you how to: ● Break any goal down into manageable tasks ● Focus on only a few tasks at a time ● Create new and productive habits ● Hone your focus ● Increase your efficiency By setting limits for yourself and making the most of the resources you already have, youll finally be able work less, work smarter, and focus on living the life that you deserve. This book can change people life. Many thought the book was about paring down the material things in life, but it's only marginally about that. It's about finding what's important and essential in your life and getting back control and personal time to do the things you love. The book is easy to read and could be a fast read, but I suggest you take your time. Try out some of the suggestions. They work! The concepts in the book can pertain to almost anything in your life -- it's really that versatile. This author has his priorities right and wants to help all of us get them right. Apply what you learn here to your life, work, health, weight, addictions, just about anything, and you can begin today to make changes that will produce a happier, more productive you. And it's not hard. Baby steps. Easy, easy. Everyone should read this book -- every person who isn't already on Mr. Babauta's plan or plans for making changes that will change lives. If you're stressed, have too much on your plate, never have time to relax and do things you're passionate about, read this. If you want to make changes in almost any area of your life, read this book. Everything about this book is doable and will work if you will just do it. If you give up easy, well there's a chapter on that too. Leo Babauta writes: "There has never before been an age in which we could get so much done so quickly. There also has never before been an age in which we were so overwhelmed with information and tasks, so overloaded with e-mails and things to read and watch, so stressed by the incredible demands of our lives." "For many people these days, work is a constant stream of e-mails, of news and requests, of phone calls and instant messages, of papers and notes and files. The day starts with an in-box full of e-mails, and ends with an in-box just as full, and each e-mail represents a request for information or for actions that we don't have time to fulfill. We are drinking from a fire hose of information, with no idea of how to reduce the flow. "It's stressful and wasteful. And if we stop to think about it, it's not how we want to spend out lives." And he is completely right. We don't want to live stressed out lives, constantly coming and going but never arriving. We want to live lives that matter, lives that influence others, lives that are slow and thoughtful and deep. We want to live lives that are intentional, lives that create the pace rather than try to keep up with it. And that is exactly what The Power of Less is all about. Slowing down and focusing on one thing at a time, both simplifying and intensely focusing on the task or circumstance directly in front of us. The author tells a compelling personal story of how he de-cluttered and minimalized his own life and as a result became physically fitter, lost weight, gave up smoking, paid off his debt, and built financial security. The bulk of the book is an easy to follow model which seeks to establish a balance between focus and goal setting. The author argues that by working on one major goal at a time, with a realistic timeline, focus naturally follows - living in the now, de-cluttering, minimizing are all side benefits of becoming focused on one particular goal. ☞ So how are we to live this type of life? ☞ Are we to have a Waldenian character constrained to the woods, or grow with the times and learn to process the vast amounts of information we see in our everyday lives? The author proposes a dramatic middle ground for the way we consume information but not let ourselves be overloaded by it: That is "one where we can still enjoy access to vast amounts of information, still have instant communication when we want it, still get things done quickly—but one in which we choose how much we consume and do." In fact, everything in the book comes back to this simple statement: "Focus on the essential and allow everything else to drop away." While the first part of the book deals with the principles of living with less, the second part gets more practical in how to actually implement some of the theoretical ideas at the beginning—goals, projects, tasks, time management, e-mail, internet, filing, commitments, daily routines, decluttering your work space, slowing down, health and fitness, and motivation. Though pretty obvious, the simple way the author broke down how to achieve goals really stuck out to me: Choose a goal. Break it down into sub-goals. Break the sub-goals down into weekly actions, and those weekly actions into daily tasks. Then those daily tasks are going to be part of your MITs (Most Important Tasks) that you do every day. There was so much in here that seems like common sense but, when you get in the hustle and bustle of life, is easily forgotten. It was fun to have an easy-to-read book that didn't take long at all, to remind me of all the practicalities of living a productive life that is rich in relationships and depth. Here are 10 big ideas from Leo Babauta’s The Power of Less … 1: Simplicity means identifying what’s essential, then eliminating the rest. It’s easy to get caught up in the demands of modern life - the world is constantly increasing in complexity, and placing more and more demands on your attention. If you try to tackle everything that grabs your attention, you’ll constantly find yourself stressed, overwhelmed, and burned out. Simplicity is the art of focusing only on what’s essential to your goals and your personal satisfaction, and ignoring the rest. Instead of paying attention to everything, simplicity is choosing to pay attention only to things that matter the most, and ignoring the rest. 2: Focusing on the essential produces the most results for the least effort. Since you only have so much time and energy each day, focusing only on what’s most important allows you to spend a much greater percentage of your time on things that will produce the most results. Instead of spreading yourself too thin, focusing on the essential helps you accomplish the things that matter most. That requires making decisions: constantly choosing what not to focus on or care about at that particular moment in time. 3: You must set limits - they don’t set themselves. Most people avoid setting limits, which is a mistake. Without limits, it’s easy to assume that everything is important, and that you’ll be able to do whatever is necessary to get everything done. Without setting limits, it’s very easy to waste time and energy working beyond the point of Diminishing Returns. Parkinson’s Law states that “work expands to fill the time allotted” - that’s why it’s easy to work until you collapse, surf the internet endlessly, and spend too much money on things that don’t really matter. You must set limits for yourself. The essence of prioritization is deciding not to do something. If everything is a #1, must-do priority, you haven’t really prioritized anything, since you haven’t made a choice. 4: Focus on only one thing at a time. Multitasking is a myth - our brains are only capable of truly paying attention to one thing at a time. When we think we’re multitasking, all we’re really doing is rapidly switching the focus of our attention from one thing to the next. Every time your focus shifts, it takes your mind a while to load the information it needs to operate effectively. That’s a Friction cost I call the “Cognitive Switching Penalty” - every time you switch focus, you pay the price. The less you switch, the less of a price you pay to be productive. 5: Limit your active goals and projects to no more than 3-4 at a time. Of all of the recommendations in The Power of Less , this is the most challenging, the most controversial, and the most powerful. If you’ve ever created a list of all of your active projects, it’s likely that it contains over 30 things you’d like to accomplish. Some projects are personal, some are family-related, and others are added to your plate via your work. You may not feel like you have a choice about taking on these projects, but you do. Think of this recommendation as a way of applying “overwhelming force” to a task to get it done as quickly as possible. Instead of trying to do 30-40 things at once (and failing miserably), limiting your active projects to no more than 3-4 preserves your focus and attention, allowing you to actually accomplish your most important objectives quickly move on to the next. Personally, I keep a list of projects I’d like to do in a “Someday / Maybe” list, which David Allen recommends in Getting Things Done. The most important of these projects are promoted to my active list, which I keep on a 3x5 index card in the notebook I use to track my to-dos. This simple practice helps me focus on what’s most important right now, and temporarily ignore the rest. 6: Establish three Most Important Tasks (MITs) every day, and do those before working on anything else. All people are created equal, but all tasks aren’t. On any given day, there are a few things that you could accomplish that would represent huge progress toward your most important projects. Those are your Most Important Tasks (MITs). For maximum daily productivity, create a list of 2-3 MITs in the morning (or the night before). When you start work in the morning, your goal is to accomplish your MITs as quickly as possible - unless there is a true emergency, all other tasks can wait, since they’re (by definition) less important. Once you accomplish your MITs, the rest of the day is a bonus - you’ve already accomplished the tasks that represent major progress toward your most important objectives. 6: Batch similar tasks together to preserve your focus. Every time you switch the object of your focus, you lose a great deal of productivity - the nefarious Cognitive Switching Penalty. To avoid the penalty, it pays to find ways to switch your focus less often. Batching is the practice of grouping similar tasks together, then tackling them all at once. Take, for instance, checking e-mail - if you check every 5 minutes, you’re constantly switching your focus and incurring the penalty. If you check and respond to your e-mail at set times during the day (say, 10:00am and 4:00pm), you can get the same amount done in less time. Errands are particularly useful to batch - how productive would it be to drive to the grocery store every time you want to buy a single item? Putting what you need on a list, then buying everything at once is clearly more efficient. Doing multiple errands at once, like going to the post office right before you go grocery shopping, is even better. Personally, early afternoons on Monday and Friday are my “miscellaneous task” times. Having a set time to batch non-critical tasks makes it much easier to stay focused, while still keeping on top of routine tasks like paying bills, cleaning, and routine car maintenance. 8: Installing positive habits is easiest when you start small, then build on your early success. When attempting to create positive Habits , most people make the mistake of trying to make too many changes at once. Installing or changing habits takes willpower, and willpower is a very limited resource. Spread your willpower too thin, and it’ll be difficult to make any of your desired habits stick. For best results, focus only on installing or changing one habit at a time, and start with small increments. If you want to start doing 100 pushups a day, start with one. Every day, add another. Building on momentum makes it much easier to make the habit stick. Whatever you do, focus on ONE (and only one) habit at a time. Practice that habit until it becomes second-nature, requiring no thought or willpower to do every day. Then, and only then, should you choose another habit to install. 9: Consciously minimize your active commitments, and don’t be afraid to say “no” to new ones. Unless you consciously control your active commitments, they’ll expand until you’re overwhelmed. It’s tempting to say yes to everything in an effort to be supportive and helpful. Few of us like the feeling of denying requests for help or disappointing others, which makes “yes” our default response to requests. Here’s the truth: your time, attention, and energy are finite. When you overwhelm yourself with commitments, you’re shortchanging the most important activities that will contribute the most to your productivity, satisfaction, and success. You’re also shortchanging the less important commitments, since they’re competing with all of the other critically important projects in your world. It’s ultimately kinder to the people you care about to be very up-front with them about your current priorities. It’s never okay to “half-ass” commitments - either commit to being “full-assed,” or “no-assed.” Compromising your commitments by keeping the weight of the world on your shoulders leads to poorer results for everyone involved. 10: Slow down, pay attention, and enjoy the process. Life can quickly pass us by unless we choose to slow down. Looking back on life, one of the most common regrets people express at the end of their lives is that it all went too quickly, and they didn’t focus enough on what was clearly the most important - family, friends, important contributions, and enjoying the small moments of life. Slowing down is the best gift you can give yourself, your friends, and your loved ones. When all is said and done, no one really cares how many zeros you have in your bank balance, what your job title is, or how many followers you have on Twitter. Recent research indicates that memorable experiences do impact your happiness and life satisfaction, so it pays to focus on ways to create memorable experiences. Slowing down and mindfully enjoying your daily experience of life is simple, effective, and free. About Author : Leo Babauta is a writer, former journalist and former editor of the Pacific Daily News. Babauta is a Top 100 blogger, as the creator of the popular Zen Habits blog and mnmlist, and author of the best-selling book, The Power of Less. He is married to Eva Cruz Babauta and has six children: Chloe, Justin, Rain, Maia, Seth and Noelle. He is the son of Guampedia managing editor Shannon Murphy and local artist and art professor Jose Babauta.

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